“the best film of the year!” MARTIN EDEN

Based on the 1909 autobiographical novel by Jack London, young Martin Eden is a charming, impoverished, self-taught sailor who dreams of becoming a writer. If he becomes a success, he believes, he might win the affections of a young, wealthy university student. Starring Luca Marinelli. Directed by Pietro Marcello. (2020 / Italy / subtitled / 129 min) Martin Eden opens on Oct 23rd.

Martin Eden might be the BEST FILM OF THE YEAR! The film is a masterpiece, so you should see it any way you can. But it’s also nice to know that even by viewing it at home you can help out a struggling, indispensable [theater].” – Vulture

CRITIC’S PICK! An INGENIOUS adaptation of the Jack London novel. The true miracle of this film is how Marcello translates London’s lush, character-revealing prose into pure cinema.The entirety of the 20th century — its promises, illusions and traumas — sweeps through the AUDACIOUS and THRILLING Martin Eden. – The New York Times

Co-feature: THE MOUTH OF THE WOLF  Pietro Marcello’s debut film won major prizes at the Berlin and Turin film festivals. The Mouth of the Wolf interweaves two love stories: the 20-year romance between a Sicilian tough guy and a transsexual former junkie whom he met in prison, and a poetic reverie of the Italian port town of Genoa, depicted in all its mysterious, fading glory. Commissioned by the Fondazione San Marcellino, a Jesuit order dedicated to helping society’s poor and marginalized, the film masterfully combines documentary with fiction and melancholy home movies from the past century with poetic images, sounds, and music of the waterfront today. Hour of the Wolf opens Oct 30th

Thank you! To everyone who helped make our GoFundMe campaign a success. Your contributions will allow us to publish The Ryder magazine electronically and continue the Film Series into the spring.

black power mixtape: free screening in switchyard park – sAT, oCT 24TH

We are co-hosting a free screening of The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975, on Sat, Oct 24th at 2pm in the Switchyard Park Pavilion (yes, there will be heat lamps). The screening is co-presented by the City of Bloomington and the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commission and will be followed by a Roundtable  Discussion on Race, Racism and Social Justice.

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 mobilizes a treasure trove of 16mm material shot by Swedish journalists who came to the US drawn by stories of urban unrest and revolution. Gaining access to many of the leaders of the Black Power Movement—Stokely Carmichael, Bobby Seale, Angela Davis and Eldridge Cleaver among them—the filmmakers captured them in intimate moments and remarkably unguarded interviews. Thirty years later, this lush collection was found languishing in the basement of Swedish Television. Director Göran Olsson and co-producer Danny Glover bring this footage to light in a mosaic of images, music and narration chronicling the evolution one of our nation’s most indelible turning points, the Black Power movement. Music by Questlove and Om’Mas Keith, and commentary from prominent African- American artists and activists who were influenced by the struggle — including Erykah Badu, Harry Belafonte, Talib Kweli, and Melvin Van Peebles — give the historical footage a fresh, contemporary resonance and makes the film an exhilarating, unprecedented account of an American revolution.

While the film is free, seating is limited. (Masks are required.) Register here.

The New Issue of The Ryder magazine is on the news stands! You can read The Ryder here.

NEW ISSUE OF THE RYDER IS ON THE STANDS

ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL

Our Oct-Nov issue is on the virtual news stands. Several readers have asked if it is possible to enlarge the type of The Ryder online. Yes you can! Click on the link. You’ll see a series of buttons at the bottom of your screen, just below the magazine. The two on the far-right are both different types of zoom functions. Experiment with them until you find the size that’s right for you.

IN THIS ISSUE:

Culture and the Pandemic As political divisions and economic hardships surge today, culture seems ironically to be flourishing under technologies like streaming and Zoom, but also struggling; museums, archives and theaters, all depend on public access and support. By Darlene J. Sadlier

Belarus or Bust There are just a handful of countries that will accept Americans during the pandemic. One of them is Belarus. It’s affordable, and it’s just downwind from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor. By John Linnemeier

Outward “Perhaps it’s the pandemic,” Lynne writes, ”that’s given me time to pause more than I normally do about my life and loves and losses.  It’s certainly made me think of my first love 57 years ago in California.” By Lynne Gilliatt

First Cow Kelly Reichardt’s first film since her IU visit is a fable of capitalism. Dreams of beating history are what Western settlement is made of. And such dreams are doomed to be dashed. By Tom Prasch

Social Psycho The Social Network turns 10 this year. American Psycho turns 20. What do Mark Zuckerberg and Patrick Bateman have in common? More than you might think. By Brian Stout

Covered Bridges What does it mean to be a Hoosier? Our author biked across the covered bridges of Parke County to find out. By Mason Cassady​

LOOKING FOR A GOOD FILM THIS WEEKEND? CHECK OUT OUR SELECTION:

12 HOUR SHIFT, ALONE, OLIVER SACKS, GOD OF THE PIANO, WE ARE LITTLE ZOMBIES, COUP 53 and more

Do You Like Thrillers?

We are opening a pair of clever, well-crafted, low-budget thrillers this week…

ALONE

A cat-and-mouse thriller, adapted from a 2011 Swedish film and reset in the wilderness of the Pacific Northwest. Alone follows Jessica, recently widowed, who is kidnapped and held captive in a remote cabin. She escapes but is lost in the heart of the untamed wilderness, with only her wits to rely on for survival. Meanwhile, her mysterious captor closes in.  Directed by John Hyams (98 min)

John Hyams directed last year’s fabulously zippy zombie series, “Black Summer.” Alone unfolds with elegant simplicity and single-minded momentum. -The New York Times

Learn more about Alone and 12 Hour Shift

12 HOUR SHIFT

12 Hour Shift is a heist-gone-wrong film set during one strange night in an Arkansas hospital. Nurse Mandy is desperate to make it through her all-night shift without incident. This is particularly hard to do when you’re involved in a black market organ-trading scheme. When her hapless but dangerous cousin Regina misplaces a kidney, Mandy and Regina frantically try to secure a replacement organ by any means necessary. Talk about bedside manner! 12 Hour Shift is an edgy, madcap odyssey directed by Brea Grant. This is actress Grant’s first film as writer-director, and she elicits wonderful performances from her largely female ensemble cast. 87 min

We are also showing: RBG, OLIVER SACKS, GOD OF THE PIANO and more

WHY THE RYDER NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT (Yes, we know, everyone is asking for your support.)

Through the years, The Ryder has been generously supported by local shops and restaurants, many of them purchasing ad space simply because they wanted to support a community magazine. Their support has benefited not just the magazine, but also, indirectly, the Film Series.
When the pandemic struck in March we decided that it was our turn to step up. Rather than suspend publication, we made the decision to publish the magazine without ad revenue. Ads would be run for free. We thought the pandemic would be under control by September and we could then make up for some of the lost funds. Clearly, we were wrong about that. Today, with the end of the pandemic nowhere in sight, we are asking for your support to publish The Ryder into the spring. Funds will be used to cover operating expenses and continue to keep paid staff employed until advertising revenue hopefully returns.

Paying it forward – with your donation of $50 or more to The Ryder, you can designate a community organization of your choice — the Community Kitchen, Middle Way House, the Animal Shelter, Bloomington Playwrights Project, the Bloomington chapter of Black Lives Matter or any other local organization — and we can reciprocate, in a small way, by offering them complimentary space in the magazine to promote their own project or fundraiser. You can make a donation through our GoFundMe page. After your donation, let us know which organization you would like to support; simply send an email to peter@theryder.com If you are not in a position to make a donation you can still help by sharing this post. THANK YOU!

SURGE

SURGE s a feature documentary about the record number of first-time female candidates who ran, won and upended politics in the historic 2018 midterm elections, featuring Liz Watson’s 2018 run for Congress.

Surge will play in our virtual cinema from Oct 10th through Oct 13th. At 8:05 on the 13th, Liz Watson will be joined by candidate Shelli Yoder, filmmakers Hannah Rosenzweig and Wendy Sachs, Jennifer Crossley (Monroe County Democratic Party), and Nicole Yates (Hoosier Women Forward) for a discussion via Zoom led by Lisa-Marie Napoli (IU PACE).

SURGE is not only about women running for office, but about women getting behind women running for office. It’s about grassroots activism. It’s about putting everything on the line.

The film screening is FREE but registration is required.

Register Today!

Special Thanks to our Sponsors:
IU Dept. of Gender Studies, Hoosier Women Forward, Monroe County Democratic Party, Democratic Women’s Caucus, Shelli Yoder for State Senate, The Hamilton-Johnsen family, Bob Arnove, Judy Klein

Don’t forget: we are also screening RBG for one more week. We are donating our share of the ticket sales (approximately 50%) to Middle Way House. The remaining 50% is being donated by Magnolia Pictures to the ACLU’s Women’s Rights Project.

You can watch RBG right here


WHY THE RYDER NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT (Yes, we know, everyone is asking for your support.)

Through the years, The Ryder has been generously supported by local shops and restaurants, many of them purchasing ad space simply because they wanted to support a community magazine. Their support has benefited not just the magazine, but also, indirectly, the Film Series.
When the pandemic struck in March we decided that it was our turn to step up. Rather than suspend publication, we made the decision to publish the magazine without ad revenue. Ads would be run for free. We thought the pandemic would be under control by September and we could then make up for some of the lost funds. Clearly, we were wrong about that. Today, with the end of the pandemic nowhere in sight, we are asking for your support to publish The Ryder into the spring. Funds will be used to cover operating expenses and continue to keep paid staff employed until advertising revenue hopefully returns.

Paying it forward – with your donation of $50 or more to The Ryder, you can designate a community organization of your choice — the Community Kitchen, Middle Way House, the Animal Shelter, Bloomington Playwrights Project, the Bloomington chapter of Black Lives Matter or any other local organization — and we can reciprocate, in a small way, by offering them complimentary space in the magazine to promote their own project or fundraiser. You can make a donation through our GoFundMe page. After your donation, let us know which organization you would like to support; simply send an email to peter@theryder.com If you are not in a position to make a donation you can still help by sharing this post. THANK YOU!

P

Paying it forward – with your donation of $50 or more to The Ryder, you can designate a community organization of your choice — the Community Kitchen, Middle Way House, the Animal Shelter, Bloomington Playwrights Project, the Bloomington chapter of Black Lives Matter or any other local organization — and we can reciprocate, in a small way, by offering them complimentary space in the magazine to promote their own project or fundraiser. You can make a donation through our GoFundMe page. After your donation, let us know which organization you would like to support; simply send an email to peter@theryder.com THANK YOU!

cOMING oCT 2: OLIVER SACKS AND SCOTT RUSSELL SANDERS

Oliver Sacks: His Own Life, playing in our virtual theater, explores the life and work of the legendary neurologist and storyteller, as he shares intimate details of his battles with drug addiction, homophobia, and a medical establishment that accepted his work only decades after the fact. Sacks was a fearless explorer of unknown mental worlds who helped redefine our understanding of the brain and mind, the diversity of human experience, and our shared humanity. Directed by Ric Burns. (111 min)

Critics Pick! A deftly edited mix of archival footage, still imagery, talking-head interviews and in-the-moment narrative, “His Own Life” — which in a perfect world would be a companion piece to Sacks’s book, not the substitute some might make it — illuminates details of what can only be called an extraordinary existence. It beautifully presents a portrait of his compassion and bravery. –The New York Times

WHY THE RYDER NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT (Yes, we know, everyone is asking for your support.)

Through the years, The Ryder has been generously supported by local shops and restaurants, many of them purchasing ad space simply because they wanted to support a community magazine. Their support has benefited not just the magazine, but also, indirectly, the Film Series.
When the pandemic struck in March we decided that it was our turn to step up. Rather than suspend publication, we made the decision to publish the magazine electronically without ad revenue. Ads would be run for free. We thought the pandemic would be under control by September and we could then make up for some of the lost funds. Clearly, we were wrong about that. Today, with the end of the pandemic nowhere in sight, we are asking for your support to publish The Ryder into the spring.  Read more

A Conversation with SCOTT RUSSELL SANDERS
Morgenstern’s Bookstore is hosting an online talk with Bloomington essayist Scott Russell Sanders. The conversation touches on the role of imagination in art, science, social reform, ethics, and everyday life.
Friday, October 2nd @ 5PM LIVE Author Talks This talk with Scott Sanders is inspired by his recently  published work, The Way of Imagination, a 0guide on how imagination can help us navigate turbulent times and find solutions in the face of harrowing environment and social challenges.
Click on these links to listen in on Zoom or Facebook live*

Oct 2nd: God of the Piano, nEW FILM BY ISRAELI FILMMAKER ITAY TAL

A Greek tragedy set in contemporary Israel, God of the Piano is the story of a concert pianist from a respected musical family who has never been able to live up to her father’s stratospheric expectations. When she becomes pregnant, she transfers her hope of being a musical prodigy onto her child. She is devastated when her son is born deaf, but she doubles down on her dream, obsessively grooming him for stardom. But as the young pianist grows up, his lack of respect for his grandfather becomes an obstacle to his career. This beautifully composed film has the pacing of a thriller. (Israel / 80 minutes)

“CRITIC’S PICK! Tal’s style has a simultaneous simplicity and density that has an affinity with the works of Lucrecia Martel and Michael Haneke. Rarely does a debut feature showcase a talent so fully formed. This is a remarkably potent film.” – Glenn Kenny, The New York Times

WHY THE RYDER NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT (Yes, we know, everyone is asking for your support.)

Through the years, The Ryder has been generously supported by local shops and restaurants, many of them purchasing ad space simply because they wanted to support a community magazine. Their support has benefited not just the magazine, but also, indirectly, the Film Series.
When the pandemic struck in March we decided that it was our turn to step up. Rather than suspend publication, we made the decision to publish the magazine electronically without ad revenue. Ads would be run for free. We thought the pandemic would be under control by September and we could then make up for some of the lost funds. Clearly, we were wrong about that. Today, with the end of the pandemic nowhere in sight, we are asking for your support to publish The Ryder into the spring.  Read more

A Conversation with Scott Russell Sanders
Morgenstern’s Bookstore is hosting an online talk with Bloomington author Scott Russell Sanders. The conversation touches on the role of imagination in art, science, social reform, ethics, and everyday life.
Friday, October 2nd @ 5PM LIVE Author Talks This talk with Scott Sanders is inspired by his recently  published work, The Way of Imagination, a 0guide on how imagination can help us navigate turbulent times and find solutions in the face of harrowing environment and social challenges.
Click on these links to listen in on Zoom or Facebook live*

RBG: Middle way house benefit screening: Now Playing

We wish we were not writing this. Or at least that the circumstances were different. We’ve had requests to bring back the documentary, RBG, which we screened when it was released in 2018. Beginning Friday, RBG will be shown in our virtual theater. We are donating 100% of our share of the ticket sales (our share is approximately 50%) to Middle Way House.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg created a breathtaking legal legacy for women’s rights while becoming an unexpected pop culture icon. The personal journey of this diminutive, quiet warrior’s rise to the nation’s highest court during a hostile time for women, is revealed in this inspiring and multidimensional portrait. Ruth Bader Ginsburg died last week at the age of 87; her voice is more essential than ever (97 min)

The idea that women are equal citizens — that barring them from certain jobs and educational opportunities and treating them as the social inferiors of men are unfair — may not seem especially controversial now. RBG uses Justice Ginsburg’s own experiences to emphasize how different things were not so long ago. The movie’s touch is light and its spirit buoyant, but there is no mistaking its seriousness or its passion. Those qualities resonate powerfully in the dissents that may prove to be Justice Ginsburg’s most enduring legacy, and RBG is, above all, a tribute to her voice. –A.O. Scott, The New York Times

WHY THE RYDER NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT TODAY

Through the years, The Ryder has been generously supported by local shops and restaurants, many of them purchasing ad space simply because they wanted to support a community magazine. Their support has benefited not just the magazine, but also, indirectly, the Film Series.
When the pandemic struck in March we decided that it was our turn to step up. Rather than suspend publication, we made the decision to publish the magazine without ad revenue. Ads would be run for free. We thought the pandemic would be under control by September and we could then make up for some of the lost funds. Clearly, we were wrong about that. Today, with the end of the pandemic nowhere in sight, we are asking for your support to publish The Ryder into the spring.
Read more

Vinyl Nation, coup 53 and more

Did you have a stamp collection when you were growing up? Or maybe you collected baseball cards. Or bottle caps. You don’t have to be a vinyl enthusiast to appreciate Vinyl Nation, just one of the films playing this week in our virtual cinema.

The vinyl record renaissance over the past decade has brought new fans to a classic format and transformed our idea of a record collector: younger, both male and female, multicultural. Vinyl Nation digs into the crates of the record resurgence in search of truths set in deep wax: Has the return of vinyl made music fandom more inclusive or divided? What does vinyl say about our past here in the present? How has the second life of vinyl changed how we hear music and how we listen to each other? Directed by Christopher Boone and Kevin Smokler, Vinyl Nation is at once a provocative look at the vinyl renaissance and a love letter to the secret delights of collectors of everything, everywhere. (92 minutes)

There’s lots more playing this week:

from Iran: COUP 53: This twisty documentary takes a deep dive into the secret history behind the 1953 CIA-MI6 led coup that overthrew the democratically elected president of Iran, and changed the course of the Middle East. There are many surprises in Coup 53, including Ralph Fiennes in an unexpected role. The filmmakers to tell the story of the overthrow of the Iranian government in unprecedented detail, but also uncover dark secrets that have been buried for 67 years.

from Japan: We Are Little Zombies: Alone in the world with no future, no dreams, and no way to move forward, four 13-year-olds dress themselves in scraps from a garbage dump, track down musical instruments, and decide to form a kick-ass band. CRITIC’S PICK! Wry humor, absurd dialogue and unflagging energy propel this dazzling, manic debut from Makoto Nagahisa…. he throws an entire box of tricks at the screen. Splitting it in two, fading to black and white, writing over it, and dunking an entire scene into a fishbowl, he fashions a fantasia of pranks so unexpected and colors so intense, they could make you hallucinate. – The New York Times

from France: My Dog Stupid: A middle-aged writer takes in an enormous stray dog against the wishes of his wife and four spoiled adult kids. (The family dynamic is amazing.) The dog, affectionately named “Stupid,” serves as both literary muse and a remembrance of lost, youthful rebellion.

from Germany: Bungalow: A major work of the celebrated Berlin School, Bungalow is a mesmerizing portrait of a young German soldier named Paul who goes AWOL and returns to his childhood home in the countryside. Over a few summer days, Paul evades the responsibilities of everyday life and falls in love with his brother’s girlfriend, disrupting the lives of everyone in his circle.

from Portugal: Paulo Rocha Long un-screened in the United States, Paulo Rocha’s ​The Green Years​ and ​Change of Life​ are two key entries in the Portuguese New Wave. Both have been restored by the Portuguese Cinematheque and are showing this week in our virtual cinema.

WE’RE SHOWING LOTS OF OTHER EXCITING FILMS: HERE IS A COMPLETE SCHEDULE:

The August/September issue of The Ryder magazine is also our annual fiction issue. Some great short stories by local storytellers as well as several non-fiction features.

Opens Sept 4th: Coup 53

This twisty documentary takes a deep dive into the secret history behind the 1953 CIA-MI6 led coup that overthrew the democratically elected president of Iran, and changed the course of the Middle East. There are many surprises in Coup 53, including Ralph Fiennes in an unexpected role.

While making a documentary about the Anglo-American coup in Iran in 1953, Iranian director Taghi Amirani and legendary editor Walter Murch) (Apocalypse Now, The Conversation, The English Patient) discover extraordinary never-before-seen archival material hidden for decades. The 16mm footage and documents not only allow the filmmakers to tell the story of the overthrow of the Iranian government in unprecedented detail, but also lead to explosive revelations about dark secrets buried for 67 years. What begins as a history documentary about 4 days in August 1953 turns into a live investigation, taking the filmmakers into uncharted cinematic waters.

The roots of Iran’s volatile relationship with Britain and America has never been so forensically and dramatically exposed. Twists and reveals that would make John le Carré smile. – Financial Times

There are lots of other films that you can see this week in our virtual cinema including . . .

from Japan: We Are Little Zombies: Alone in the world with no future, no dreams, and no way to move forward, four 13-year-olds dress themselves in scraps from a garbage dump, track down musical instruments, and decide to form a kick-ass band. CRITIC’S PICK! Wry humor, absurd dialogue and unflagging energy propel this dazzling, manic debut from Makoto Nagahisa…. he throws an entire box of tricks at the screen. Splitting it in two, fading to black and white, writing over it, and dunking an entire scene into a fishbowl, he fashions a fantasia of pranks so unexpected and colors so intense, they could make you hallucinate. – The New York Times

from France: My Dog Stupid: A middle-aged writer takes in an enormous stray dog against the wishes of his wife and four spoiled adult kids. (The family dynamic is amazing.) The dog, affectionately named “Stupid,” serves as both literary muse and a remembrance of lost, youthful rebellion.

from Germany: Bungalow: A major work of the celebrated Berlin School, Bungalow is a mesmerizing portrait of a young German soldier named Paul who goes AWOL and returns to his childhood home in the countryside. Over a few summer days, Paul evades the responsibilities of everyday life and falls in love with his brother’s girlfriend, disrupting the lives of everyone in his circle.

from Portugal: Paulo Rocha Long un-screened in the United States, Paulo Rocha’s ​The Green Years​ and ​Change of Life​ are two key entries in the Portuguese New Wave. Both have been restored by the Portuguese Cinematheque and are showing this week in our virtual cinema.

WE’RE SHOWING LOTS OF OTHER EXCITING FILMS: HERE IS A COMPLETE SCHEDULE:

Don’t forget to check out the new issue of The Ryder magazine

The Ryder is normally distributed free throughout Bloomington and supported by local advertising. That is not the case during the pandemic. The display ads in this issue have been offered to restaurants and community organizations at no charge. So if you read an article that you like or just want to support locally produced, independent journalism, please consider making a donation.

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