Joan of arc, mysteries of lisbon – ryder films this week

Here’s what’s playing this week in our virtual cinema…

Mysteries of Lisbon

Raul Ruiz’s masterful adaptation of the classic Portuguese novel evokes the complex intertwined narratives of Victor Hugo and Charles Dickens and is “one of the first cinematic masterpieces of this century.” – Film Comment Find out more »

Joan of Arc – Q&A w/filmmaker on June 4th

Compelled by visions of God, young Joan leads the French charge against invading English forces. When she is captured, the Church sends her for trial on charges of heresy. Refusing to accept the accusations, the graceful Joan of Arc will stay true to her mission. Find out more »

A White, White Day

A bereft former police chief whose golden years are spent caring for his granddaughter and remodeling a house, begins to suspect a local man of having had an affair with his late wife. Filmmaker Hlynur Pálmason finds seemingly boundless new ways to capture the volatile climate, the elemental delights and estrangement of Iceland’s east coast, and the unpredictable nature of grief in A White, White Day. Find out more »

Santiago, Italia

In the early seventies, the world was watching as Chilean voters elected Socialist leader Salvador Allende. His political ideals and aspirations—among them providing education for all children and distributing land to the nation’s workers—terrified the country’s right-wing, as well as the U.S. Nanni Moretti tells a story many viewers may not know about: the efforts of the Italian Embassy to save and relocate citizens targeted by the fascist Pinochet regime in Chile. Find out more »

The Wolf House

The Wolf House is an animated feature that tells the story of a young girl who escapes a cult colony of religious fanatics during Chile’s darkest years under rule of military dictator, Augusto Pinochet. Find out more »

Mephisto

“What do they want from me now? After all, I am just an actor.” So how did an up-and-coming thespian with a mixed-race mistress and left-wing sympathies make it to the top of Nazi Germany’s theatrical world? Find out more »

New French Shorts 2020

A feature-length program of delightful, funny, charming, provocative festival favorite Gallic shorts. Find out more »

The Booksellers

Antiquarian booksellers — whose job requires the disparate skills of a scholar, a detective, and a businessperson — have personalities and knowledge bases that are as broad and deep as the material they handle. ​This Booksellers burrows deep inside their small but fascinating world, populated by an assortment of obsessives, intellects, oddballs and dreamers. Find out more »

Capital in the 21st Century

A lively, entertaining, and eye-opening look at the number one economic issue of our time
(and the 2020 elections) Find out more »

New Animation: The Wolf House

If you are a fan of animation you’ll want to see The Wolf House: the story of a young girl who escapes a cult colony of religious fanatics during Chile’s darkest years under rule of military dictator, Augusto Pinochet. (This is actually one of two films that we are opening this week about Chile during Pinochet’s rule; the other is Santiago, Italia.)

Look for a new issue of The Ryder magazine on virtual newsstands all over the internet.

And there’s still time to submit a short story for our upcoming issue.

There are lots of other exciting films streaming in our virtual theater including THE BOOKSELLERS, A WHITE, WHITE DAY and CAPITAL IN THE 21ST CENTURY

MEPHISTO AND FRENCH SHORTS 2020 OPEN FRIDAY

“What do they want from me now? After all, I am just an actor.” This is a line from Mephisto, the Academy Award winning film about an actor in Nazi Germany who makes a demonic deal to ensure his success on the stage. It also echoes a line often heard around the Ryder offices: “What do they want from me now? After all, I’m just a film programmer.” That said, we’ve entered no such Satanic arrangements. At least not yet. Mephisto opens on Friday. READ MORE

We’re also bringing in a delightful, funny, charming, provocative collection of festival-favorite Gallic shorts. READ MORE

HELD OVER

Capital in the 21st Century is based on the international bestseller by rock-star economist Thomas Piketty (which sold over three million copies worldwide and landed Piketty on Time Magazine‘s list of most influential people), this entertaining documentary is an accessible journey through wealth and power, a film that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress. Picketty’s book has been acclaimed as “the most important economics book of the year — and maybe the decade.” – Paul Krugman, The New York Times READ MORE

Independent booksellers are not usually reaping the rewards of capitalism in the 21st century. But their love of books is rewarding in and of itself and besides, they lead rich, interior lives. The Booksellers is also on the virtual screen this week. And there’s a special offer from Caveat Emptor for those who see the film… READ MORE

A White, White Day was Iceland’s nominee for an Academy Award for Best International Feature Film. A psychological thriller from Iceland, A White, White Day will surprise you at every turn. READ MORE

Also on the screen this week – The Wild Goose Lake and Slay The Dragon

Bloomington’s Charlotte Zietlow has some good ideas on how to make city and county government work better. And she writes about them in the current issue of The Ryder magazine. If you haven’t picked up a copy of the April/May Ryder yet, you’re missing out: here it is

We’re still accepting submissions for our upcoming fiction issue. READ MORE

Ever wonder how rich people get rich?

Capital in the 21st Century, currently playing in our virtual theater, answers that question and more. Based on the international bestseller by rock-star economist Thomas Piketty (which sold over three million copies worldwide and landed Piketty on Time Magazine‘s list of most influential people), this entertaining documentary is an accessible journey through wealth and power, a film that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress. Picketty’s book has been acclaimed as “the most important economics book of the year — and maybe the decade.” – Paul Krugman, The New York Times READ MORE

Do you know who doesn’t get rich…? Independent booksellers. But their love of books is rewarding in and of itself and besides, they lead rich, interior lives. And a few of them actually make some money.  The Booksellers is also on the virtual screen this week. And there’s a special offer from Caveat Emptor for those who see the film… READ MORE

A White, White Day was Iceland’s nominee for an Academy Award for Best International Feature Film and it is screening now in our virtual theater. A psychological thriller from Iceland, A White, White Day will surprise you at every turn. READ MORE

Also on the screen this week – The Wild Goose Lake and Slay The Dragon

Linda Poteat worked at the Irish Lion the the 1990s. Today she’s a United Nations director fighting pandemics around the world. If you haven’t picked up a copy of the April/May Ryder magazine yet, you’re missing out: here it is

We’re still accepting submissions for our upcoming fiction issue. There are very few certainties in life but one of them is you’ll never get rich writing short stories. That said, if you still want to submit . . . READ MORE

A WHITE, WHITE DAY: one of two films opening at ryder

A White, White Day was shortlisted for an Academy Award for Best International Feature Film and it is opening Friday in our virtual theater. A psychological thriller from Iceland, A White, White Day will surprise you at every turn.

READ MORE

We are also opening the non-fiction film, Capital in the 21st Century. Based on the international bestseller by rock-star economist Thomas Piketty (which sold over three million copies worldwide and landed Piketty on Time Magazine‘s list of most influential people), this entertaining documentary is an accessible journey through wealth and power, a film that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress. Picketty’s book has been acclaimed as “the most important economics book of the year — and maybe the decade.” – Paul Krugman, The New York Times

READ MORE

Don’t forget: We are also screening The Booksellers, The Wild Goose Lake and Slay The Dragon.

Now might be as good a time as any to dust off that short story that you started when you were an undergrad and get back to work on it. Here’s a way to fill those endless, empty hours with an activity that is might be a bit more rewarding than those reruns of Everybody Loves Raymond that you’ve been watching. It costs nothing to enter and if your story is selected, you’ll be showered in riches beyond your wildest dreams. READ MORE

The April/May issue is on the virtual newsstand. Read The Ryder Thanks , as always, for supporting local journalism.

An offer you can’t refuse from caveat emptor

Antiquarian booksellers have personalities and knowledge bases that are as broad and deep as the material they handle. ​ Their job requires the disparate skills of a scholar, a detective, and a businessperson. (The same can be said about the skills of the film programmers at The Ryder, minus the “businessperson” part.) D.W. Young’s new film burrows deep inside the fascinating world of booksellers, a community populated by an lovable assortment of obsessives, intellects, oddballs and dreamers. The Booksellers opens in The Ryder’s virtual theater on Friday. READ MORE ABOUT THE BOOKSELLERS

Our amazing local bookstore, Caveat Emptor, is offering Ryder filmgoers a deal that’s hard to pass up. They will match any purchase dollar-for-dollar with store credit. So if you buy $20 worth of books, you will get $20 in store credit towards a future purchase. Just show them your receipt from your ticket to The Booksellers.

And while we’re on the subject of books and bookstores, we’re accepting submissions for our annual short story issue.

Now might be as good a time as any to dust off that short story that you started when you were an undergrad and get back to work on it. Here’s a way to fill those endless, empty hours with an activity that is might be a bit more rewarding than those reruns of Everybody Loves Raymond that you’ve been watching. It costs nothing to enter and if your story is selected, you’ll be showered in riches beyond your wildest dreams. READ MORE

Do you like books? ‘The Booksellers’ opens on friday

Antiquarian booksellers have personalities and knowledge bases that are as broad and deep as the material they handle. ​ Their job requires the disparate skills of a scholar, a detective, and a businessperson. The same can be said about the skills of the film programmers at The Ryder, minus the “businessperson” part. D.W. Young’s new film burrows deep inside the fascinating world of booksellers, a community populated by an lovable assortment of obsessives, intellects, oddballs and dreamers. The Booksellers opens in The Ryder’s virtual theater on Friday. READ MORE ABOUT THE BOOKSELLERS

And while we’re on the subject of books, we’re accepting submissions for our annual short story issue.

Think about it . Dust off that short story that you started when you were an undergrad and get back to work on it. Here’s a way to fill those endless, empty hours with an activity that is might be a bit more rewarding than those reruns of Everybody Loves Raymond that you’ve been watching. It costs nothing to enter and if your story is selected, you’ll be showered in riches beyond your wildest dreams. READ MORE

cELEBRATING eARTH dAY: nICHOLAS Geyrhalter’s ‘eARTH’

Nicholas Geyrhalter’s acclaimed documentary, Earth, opens on Wednesday for a one week run. Earth was filmed at seven places where humans are transforming the planet on a grand scale: Entire mountains being moved in California, a tunnel being sliced through rock at the Brenner Pass, an open-cast mine in Hungary, the world-famous Carrara marble quarry in Italy, a copper mine in Spain, the salt mine used to store radioactive waste in Wolfenbüttel and a Northern Canadian tar sands site where the destruction of indigenous lands threatens local communities.

Filmmaker Nicholas Geyrhalter contrasts these large scale projects with interviews with the individuals helping to realize them to highlight our fraught struggles for and against the planet.

 FILM OF THE WEEK! “Spectacular, even awe-inspiring.”
—Jonathan Romney, Film Comment

READ MORE

Don’t forget: there’s more to see in our virtual theater: THE WILD GOOSE LAKE, SLAY THE DRAGON, ONCE WERE BROTHERS , THE WHISTLERS. CORPUS CHRISTI and THE WOMAN WHO LOVES GIRAFFES

Two new films open

We are screening 6 first-run feature films this weekend in our new virtual cinema. Keep an eye on us — don’t let us turn into a virtual multiplex. This is the final week for ONCE WERE BROTHERS and THE WHISTLERS. CORPUS CHRISTI and THE WOMAN WHO LOVES GIRAFFES are both on our calendar for another week. And then there are two new films . . .

The Wild Goose Lake

A gangster on the run — and seeking redemption — meets a woman who’ll risk everything to gain her own freedom, in this noir crime thriller set in the nooks and crannies of densely populated Wuhan in Central China. READ MORE

SLAY THE DRAGON

Every ten years, new county lines are drawn across the USA that determine the fate of the country for the next decade. The rousing Slay the Dragon convincingly makes the argument that this practice has been used for partisan, and possibly illegal, gains since nearly its inception. “The most important political film of the year, and it may prove to be one of the key political films of the decade.” – Owen Gleiberman, Variety READ MORE

50% of the ticket proceeds will eventually make their way back to us. Thanks, as always, for supporting independent film and local cinemas.

Stay safe and be smart.

Four Films this Weekend

We are screening four feature films this weekend: Once Were Brothers, The WhistlersCorpus Christi and The Woman Who Loves Giraffes. You can watch each of these at any time on our site in our new virtual screening room.

For those of you who may have missed our earlier updates, here’s a heads-up: these films are priced at $12. At first glance, this might seem more expensive than a typical Ryder movie. Virtual screening ticket prices are set by the distributor and are the same for every “art house” theater or film program in the country. That said, some of you – perhaps most of you – will be watching the film with at least one other person. Tickets should still average pretty close to $6 per person. Although prices are set nationally, your local independent theater (in this case, us) will receive 50% of the ticket sales which will help us stay afloat until we can once again show films in person.

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