FREE SHOWING: WILLY WONKA & THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY – fRI, jULY 30 IN BRYAN PARK

Bring a blanket. Bring the dog. Bring a chocolate bar (but don’t give it to the dog). Gene Wilder and Peter Ostrum star in this 50th Anniversary screening of Roald Dahl’s Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, about a zany chocolatier and a poor boy who hopes to win a tour of the magnificent, mysterious chocolate factory. (1 hr, 40 min)

Willy Wonka will start at dusk on Friday, July 30th in Bryan Park.

(Roald Dahl reportedly was not a fan of the film—then again, what does he know? Warner Bros. recently announced plans for a prequel, which will star Timothée Chalamet.)

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Our July/August issue is on the virtual newsstands. Here is your hand-delivered copy. There’s some good stuff in this month’s issue including:

Where Do We Go When We Die? The ongoing Covid-19 catastrophe has tasked us to confront mortality on a daily basis. By Pennfield Jensen

Friday Night at Dinky’s Dinky’s is the name and auction is the game at this Amish-owned-and-operated institution in Daviess County. The auctions take place inside two of the biggest barns you might ever see and attract hundreds of bargain-seekers from far and wide. By Mason Cassady

Middle Way House: Candid Conversations  We are running a series of interviews with Middle Way members in recognition of the domestic violence shelter’s 50th Anniversary. This month features conversations with Penny Gaither and Cindy Houston. “I lived in fear,” Penny says about her life before joining Middle Way. Cindy Houston’s dream is that one day we can “close the shelter, because nobody needs it.” Interviews by Robert F. Arnove


We hope to resume weekly, in-person film screenings in August when campus re-opens (assuming there are no surprises). We may also resume the print edition of the magazine. Let’s all cross our fingers and keep them crossed.

In the meantime, please help keep the Film Series and The Ryder magazine going and consider making a donation

Call for Submissions: Ryder Fiction Issue

Our annual fiction issue is coming in October and we are reading submissions from Bloomington writers. This year’s fiction issue will have a Halloween theme. Send your best spooky short story to editor@theryder.com. Please put Fiction Submission in the subject line.

“Short” in this case means up to 5,000 words. Although we readily acknowledge that “we can be talked into almost anything,” in this case word length is not negotiable. The 5,001st word will not be considered, no matter how thrilling it might be.

Format: double-spaced in Word.

We look forward to reading your work!

cHRISTMAS IN jULY! fREE sCREENING OF eLF Sat July 17

Bring a blanket! Bring a snack! Bring the dog! We are showing Elf, starring Will Farrell, Sat, July 17 in Reverend Ernest D. Butler Park.

Elf is a 2003 American Christmas comedy starring Will Ferrell, as Buddy, a human who was adopted and raised by Santa’s elves. After learning he was adopted, Buddy embarks on a quest to find his biological father in New York City. James Caan, Zooey Deschanel, Mary Steenburgen, Daniel Tay, Bob Newhart and Ed Asner co-star. Elf was directed by Jon Favreau (Swingers) and produced by Peter Billingsley (best known as Ralphie in A Christmas Story). The director and producer both have cameos: Favreau as the doctor who administers Buddy’s DNA test and tells him to stop eating cotton balls, and Billingsley, as a toy-making elf in Santa’s workshop

Elf begins at dusk on Sat, July 17th. The screening is free.


Our July issue is on the virtual newsstands. Here is your hand-delivered copy. There’s some good stuff in this month’s issue including:

Where Do We Go When We Die? The ongoing Covid-19 catastrophe has tasked us to confront mortality on a daily basis. By Pennfield Jensen

Friday Night at Dinky’s Dinky’s is the name and auction is the game at this Amish-owned-and-operated institution in Daviess County. The auctions take place inside two of the biggest barns you might ever see and attract hundreds of bargain-seekers from far and wide. By Mason Cassady

Middle Way House: Candid Conversations  We are running a series of interviews with Middle Way members in recognition of the domestic violence shelter’s 50th Anniversary. This month features conversations with Penny Gaither and Cindy Houston. “I lived in fear,” Penny says about her life before joining Middle Way. Cindy Houston’s dream is that one day we can “close the shelter, because nobody needs it.” Interviews by Robert F. Arnove


We hope to resume weekly, in-person film screenings in August when campus re-opens (assuming there are no surprises). We may also resume the print edition of the magazine. Let’s all cross our fingers and keep them crossed.

In the meantime, please help keep the Film Series and The Ryder magazine going and consider making a donation

GUNDA is “Spellbinding and Profoundly Moving”

You can watch Gunda right here, right now (FINAL NIGHT! JULY 15)

Experiential cinema in its purest form, Gunda chronicles the unfiltered lives of a mother pig (whom the film is named after), a flock of chickens, and a herd of cows with masterful intimacy. Gunda is a labor of love by Russian director Victor Kossakovsky Using stark, transcendent black and white cinematography and the farm’s ambient soundtrack, director Kossakovsky invites the audience to slow down and experience life as his subjects do, taking in their world with a magical patience and an other worldly perspective. Gunda asks us to meditate on the mystery of animal consciousness, and reckon with the role humanity plays in it. (Kossakovsky jokes that he discovered Gunda on a Norwegian farm, on what he refers to as “the first day of casting.”)  93 min

Gunda ― which doubles as the name of the movie and the name of the pig ― is as close as we may ever come to experiencing the world as animals do, specifically the animals that become our food. –Boston Globe

SPELLBINDING, SUBLIMELY BEAUTIFUL and PROFOUNDLY MOVING, Gunda offers you the opportunity to look — at animals, yes, but also at qualities that are often subordinated in narratively driven movies, at textures, shapes and light. These images testify that to see, really see, through the eyes of others, four-legged or otherwise, is to be fully human. CRITIC’S PICK! –The New York Times

jULY iSSUE OF THE rYDER mAGAZINE

Our July issue is on the virtual newsstands. Here is your hand-delivered copy. There’s some good stuff in this month’s issue including:

Where Do We Go When We Die?

The ongoing Covid-19 catastrophe has tasked us to confront mortality on a daily basis. By Pennfield Jensen

Friday Night at Dinky’s

Dinky’s is the name and auction is the game at this Amish-owned-and-operated institution in Daviess County. The auctions take place inside two of the biggest barns you might ever see and attract hundreds of bargain-seekers from far and wide. By Mason Cassady

Middle Way House: Candid Conversations 

We are running a series of interviews with Middle Way members in recognition of the domestic violence shelter’s 50th Anniversary. This month features conversations with Penny Gaither and Cindy Houston. “I lived in fear,” Penny says about her life before joining Middle Way. Cindy Houston’s dream is that one day we can “close the shelter, because nobody needs it.” Interviews by Robert F. Arnove


We hope to resume weekly, in-person film screenings in August when campus re-opens (assuming there are no surprises). We may also resume the print edition of the magazine. Let’s all cross our fingers and keep them crossed.

In the meantime, please keep the Film Series and The Ryder magazine going and consider making a donation

The Manchurian Candidate: Free Showing Sat Night in Bryan Park – CANCELLED

Tonight’s screening of the Manchurian Candidate has been cancelled due to extreme sogginess. It will be rescheduled. Stay tuned.

Frank Sinatra, Angela Lansbury, Laurence Harvey and Janet Leigh star in The Manchurian Candidate.

Raymond Shaw (Sinatra) is a war hero and is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his bravery in Korea. What no one knows, including Shaw, is that he had been captured by the Chinese Communists and brainwashed. He is now an unwitting puppet who will do their bidding. Angela Lansbury gives one of the all-time creepy performances as his ambitious, manipulative mother. Directed by John Frankenheimer. (1962; 2 hrs, 6 min)

File this under Art Imitates Real Life (or maybe it’s the other way around)….FBI Assistant Deputy Director Peter Strzok testified before Congress that investigators came to believe it was “conceivable, if unlikely” that Russia was secretly controlling President Donald Trump after he took office — a full-fledged “Manchurian candidate” installed as America’s commander in chief.

Covid Guidelines:

If you are sick, or have any symptoms of Covid-19, please stay home.
Practice physical distancing by staying at least 6 feet away from others.
Wash your hands thoroughly and often; sneeze and cough into your elbow; avoid touching your face.

Chasing Ghosts: The Life of an American Artist

ou can watch this film right here, right now
This illuminating documentary explores the life of a unique American artist, a man with a remarkable and unlikely biography. Bill Traylor was born into slavery in 1853 on a cotton plantation in rural Alabama. After the Civil War, Traylor continued to farm the land as a sharecropper until the late 1920s. Aging and alone, he moved to Montgomery and worked odd jobs in the thriving segregated black neighborhood. A decade later, in his late 80s, Traylor became homeless and started to draw and paint, both memories from plantation days and scenes of a radically changing urban culture. Having witnessed profound social and political change during a life spanning slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, and the Great Migration, Traylor devised his own visual language to translate an oral culture into something original, powerful, and culturally rooted. He made well over a thousand drawings and paintings between 1939-1942. This colorful, strikingly modernist work eventually led him to be recognized as one of America’s greatest self-taught artists and the subject of a Smithsonian retrospective. Using historical and cultural context, Bill Traylor: Chasing Ghosts brings the spirit and mystery of Traylor’s incomparable art to life. Making dramatic and surprising use of tap dance and evocative period music, the film balances archival photographs and footage, insightful perspectives from his descendents, and Traylor’s striking drawings and paintings to reveal one of America’s most prominent artists to a wide audience. CRITIC’S PICK! –The New York Times “An extraordinary artist…Traylor’s pictures stamp themselves on your eye and mind… (nothing) impaired the humor and subtlety of his imagination. Traylor’s art generates a presence at once mighty and fugitive, forever just around the corner of being understood.”  – Peter Schjeldahl, The New Yorker
   

About Endlessness opens this week

No one in the world makes films that look like those of Swedish master absurdist Roy Andersson: intricately designed, photographed, and lit. His dreamlike movies are acclaimed for their deadpan comic timing and the visual inspiration of artists like Otto Dix and Edward Hopper.  Some of you saw his film A PIGEON SAT ON A BRANCH REFLECTING ON EXISTENCE when we showed it in 2015, but just in case you missed it, we are showing it again, along with his new film, ABOUT ENDLESSNESS.

ABOUT ENDLESSNESS (Best Director prize-winner at the Venice Film Festival), opens with a breathtaking shot, inspired by Marc Chagall, of two lovers hovering in the clouds. What follows is pure Andersson, a succession of precisely realized, blackly comic vignettes on the complexities of human nature: a priest loses his faith after recurring nightmares detailing his own crucifixion; a father stops to tie his daughter’s shoelaces in the rain; a man obsesses over a brush-off from an old classmate (“I can’t believe Svenker Olsson got a PhD. It’s really quite annoying”); a couple contentedly sips champagne to the sounds of Billie Holiday; a dentist walks out on a wailing patient and into a bar, downing a drink as snow majestically falls outside; and that couple floats over a war-ravaged Cologne. Addressing the vexing qualities of existence, Andersson mixes the challenges of everyday life with the flashes of beauty and grace we take for granted.

SWEDEN / GERMANY / NORWAY       76 MIN       IN SWEDISH WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES

Another masterpiece of the human condition, ranging from the evils of war to the redemptive power of love…WHAT AN AMAZING EXPERIENCE THIS FILM IS. Andersson’s films are endlessly rewatchable. To view them is to abolish gravity. – Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

We hope to resume weekly, in-person film screenings in August when campus re-opens (assuming there are no surprises). Let’s all cross our fingers and keep them crossed.

In the meantime, please keep the Film Series and The Ryder magazine going and consider making a donation

Are You a Dog Lover? “Stray” Might be the Film For You

You can watch Stray in our virtual theater right here, right now

Woof Woof! Stray explores what it means to live as a being without status or security, following three stray dogs, residents of Istanbul, as they embark on inconspicuous journeys through Turkish society. Zeytin, fiercely independent, embarks on adventures through the city at night; Nazar, nurturing and protective, easily befriends the humans around her; while Kartal, a shy puppy living on the outskirts of a construction site, finds companions in the security guards who care for her. The strays’ disparate lives intersect when they each form intimate bonds with a group of young Syrians with whom they share the streets. (72 mn) An interview with filmmaker Elizabeth Lo will follow the film.

CRITIC’S PICK! Stray builds a subtle, cross-species commentary that’s more than a little melancholy. While never directly political, Lo’s camera is there when the animals encounter a women’s march for equality and, later, when the refugees connect with boatmen who share their own migrant past. The filmmaker’s eyes may rarely leave the dogs, but what she’s really looking at is us. -The New York Times

We hope to resume weekly, in-person film screenings in August when campus re-opens (assuming there are no surprises). Let’s all cross our fingers and keep them crossed.

In the meantime, please keep the Film Series and The Ryder magazine going and consider making a donation

Give the Oscar shorts to a friend

The Academy Awards are Sunday night. If you haven’t watched the Oscar Shorts yet this might be a good time. Here’s the link. And if you have already watched them, you might consider gifting the Shorts to your favorite cinephile. Simply click on the Watch Now button. You’ll find a “Give as a Gift” option just below the Unlock button. The Oscar Shorts are a gift that will be fondly remembered for a long time, or at least until Sunday night.


The new issue of The Ryder magazine is on the virtual newsstands. What’s inside? See for yourself: here’s your personal copy. And here is a snapshot of what you’ll find…

  • Rudy Pozzatti (1925-2021): Rudy Pozzatti embodied the ideal of the artist-teacher. During his lengthy tenure as a distinguished professor at Indiana University, he helped to build the printmaking department into one the best in the country. By Nanette Esseck Brewer
  • Middle Way House Turns 50: “Living in a shelter is tough,” Executive Director Debra Morrow explains. “It’s not your home. The longer people sit in shelter, the harder it is for them to reclaim their lives. “ By Robert F. Arnove
  • The Lilly Library from A to Z: From James Bond’s cigars to locks of Edgar Allen Poe’s hair, the Lilly Library boasts an amazing collection of curiosities.  And they are all in Darlene J. Sadlier’s book, The Lilly Library from A to Z.  By Noah Sandweiss
  • What We Talk About When We Talk About Appalachia: Three films–Hillbilly, Nomadland and Hillbilly Elegy–take on working class white identity in Appalachia.
  • Die Pest: In pandemic times, we search out pandemic tales. Otto Rippert’s silent 1919 film, Die Pest in Florenz (The Plague in Florenz) is a plague film for a plague year.
  • This Old House: Jawshing Arthur Liou’s multichannel video work at the Eskenazai Museum of Art, House of the Singing Winds, embraces high resolution video. But art is directly tied to economics and politics. Money and influence have a particularly unique relationship with the film/video artforms due to high equipment costs, studios, “the industry” and many other components. “IU has many T.C. Steele paintings in its collection,” Liou says. “I’m bringing the whole house.” By Ian Carstens

This issue of The Ryder is funded in part by a Recover Forward grant from the Bloomington Urban Enterprise Association. The grant covers some of our expenses, but not all.
As you flip through this issue of the magazine (85 pages this month!), if you should see a story that you like, or if you would just want to support local, independent journalism, please consider making a donation.


Also in our Virtual Theater: BILL TRAYLOR CHASING GHOSTS

Bill Traylor was born into slavery in 1853 on a cotton plantation in rural Alabama. After the Civil War, Traylor continued to farm the land as a sharecropper until the late 1920s. Aging and alone, he moved to Montgomery and worked odd jobs in the thriving segregated black neighborhood. A decade later, in his late 80s, Traylor became homeless and started to draw and paint, visualizing memories from plantation days and scenes of a radically changing urban culture. Having witnessed profound social and political change during a life spanning slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, and the Great Migration, Traylor devised his own visual language to translate an oral culture into something original, powerful, and culturally rooted. He made well over a thousand drawings and paintings between 1939-1942. This colorful, strikingly modernist work eventually led him to be recognized as one of America’s greatest self-taught artists and the subject of a Smithsonian retrospective. Using historical and cultural context, Bill Traylor: Chasing Ghosts brings the spirit and mystery of Traylor’s incomparable art to life. Making dramatic and surprising use of tap dance and evocative period music, the film balances archival photographs and footage, insightful perspectives from his descendants, and Traylor’s striking drawings and paintings to reveal one of America’s most prominent artists to a wide audience.

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