O’Brother, Where art thou? August 8th in Bryan Park

Bring a blanket. Bring a snack. Bring the dog. Bring hand sanitizer. O Brother, Where Art Thou? will be screened under the stars in Bryan Park on August 8th.

A trio of escaped prisoners embarks on the adventure of a lifetime as they set out to pursue their freedom and discover buried treasure in the rural South in the 1930s. Endlessly surprising and as giddily and defiantly unclassifiable as all other Coen Brothers films, O Brother, Where Art Thou?  is, among many other things, a celebration of American music. With a score curated and produced by T-Bone Burnett, the movie sings with voices and sounds of some of the best musicians in the country, including Ralph Stanley, the Fairfield Four, Alison Krauss, John Hartford, Emmylou Harris, and Gillian Welch, and the melodies of classics like “Big Rock Candy Mountain,” “I’ll Fly Away,” and the film’s touchstone, “Man of Constant Sorrow.” George Clooney, Tim Blake Nelson and John Turturro star.

Masks are required and seating is limited. Tickets of course are free. Our recent outdoor screening of Toy Story 4 sold out so you should reserve your tickets more or less right away. Here is the link.  He who hesitates is … how does that expression go? No matter. Reserve your seats today.

This week’s ryder films

Sexy, audacious, thought-provoking and funny: these are all good things, right? And that’s what we get from Aria which opens this Friday in our virtual cinema. In 1987, ten of the world’s most creative and celebrated directors were each given the same brief: to choose a piece of opera music and then present a visual interpretation of that music with complete artistic freedom. The result: ten short pieces directed by ten different filmmakers, each interpreting a particular an aria (Vivaldi, Bach, Wagner). These are freewheeling interpretations so if you are looking for something traditional, you might be disappointed. But if you’re OK with sexy, audacious, thought-provoking and funny, well, then, this just might be your cup of tea.

The 10 filmmakers are Robert Altman, Bruce Beresford, Bill Bryden, Jean Luc Godard, Derek Jarman, Franc Roddam, Nicolas Roeg, Ken Russell, Charles Sturridge, and Julien Temple.

Aria includes Bridget Fonda’s electrifying film debut, a breathtaking performance from Elizabeth Hurley, as well as performances by Tilda Swinton, John Hurt, and Theresa Russell as the trigger-happy King Zog of Albania.

Also opening this weekend: The 11th Green. An investigative reporter, a 1950s government conspiracy, and extraterrestrials — what more could you ask for? The 11th Green is “Wildly inventive . . . a work of meticulous historical reimagination.” – The New Yorker

There’s more: most notably John Lewis: Good Trouble. John Lewis, who died earlier this week, led an extraordinary life highlighted by his 60- plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health care reform and immigration. The new film, John Lewis: Good Trouble,tells the story of this national treasure so that generations to come can continue to learn from Mr. Lewis’ remarkable story.

We’re thrilled to present Peter Sellers’ “lost” comedy (and his only directorial effort) Mr. Topaze. Sellers stars as Auguste Topaze, a poor but proud schoolteacher. Unwilling to sacrifice his principles, he loses his job after refusing to alter the failing grades of one of students. Chances are there are at least a few of you who have found yourselves in similar situations (we’ll leave it to you to decide how to take that).

Guest of Honour: This is the new film by Canadian filmmaker Adam Egoyan (The Sweet Hereafter). Acclaimed British actor David Thewlis stars as a Toronto health inspector who spends his days frequenting family-owned restaurants and wielding the power to shutter their dreams at the slightest provocation. But serving as a guardian angel for unsuspecting diners can’t begin to ease the conscience of a confused and conflicted man.

We’re featuring a pair of films about mid-20th century American writers: Shirley Jackson and Flannery O’Connor. Shirley Jackson is perhaps best known for her short story, The Lottery (although her novel, The Haunting of Hill House, is widely considered a master class in how to write a ghost story). Elizabeth Moss gives an uncanny performance as the unconventional writer in the new movie, Shirley. Set in a small Vermont college town (Bennington), in the summer of 1964, Shirley and her husband (the influential literary critic and philandering college professor Stanley Hyman) offer to share their house with a young graduate student and his pregnant wife. The newly married couple have no idea what they’re in for.

In a small town you can lie… you can commit adultery, you can even murder somebody, but you can’t not go to church.” Here, Louise Abbott evokes the social hypocrisy and harsh realism that inspired the stories of her friend, the celebrated Southern writer Flannery O’Connor. Flannery is the lyrical, intimate exploration of her life and work. Her distinctive Southern Gothic style influenced a generation of artists and activists.

If you’re like us, then you like to spend some of your pandemic induced down time solving crimes. We are featuring two delicious murder mysteries: one from Italy and one from France. Both will keep you guessing who is the true murderer until the very end.

THE INVISIBLE WITNESS:  A young, successful entrepreneur wakes up in a hotel room locked from the inside next to his dead lover. He becomes the chief suspect, While awaiting trial under house arrest, he enlists the aid of a defense attorney who has never lost a case. Largely told in flashback, this noirish thriller from director Stefano Mordini recreates the days of intrigue that lead up to that fateful night. Characters’ motivations begin to blur until no one is quite who they seem to be, leading to a pulse-pounding conclusion that will leave you guessing until the final shot.  (in Italian with subtitles; 102 minutes; 2020)

THE GIRL WITH A BRACELET: Lise is 18 years old and is accused of murdering her best friend two years earlier. She’s been under house arrest, wearing an ankle bracelet to monitor her whereabouts, hence the film’s title. As her trial starts, her parents stand by her side. But once her secret life is revealed in court, her innocence is far from certain and her parents’ faith begins to unravel. Directed by Stéphane Demoustier (in French with subtitles; 96 minutes; 2020)

Here’s a film for the young and the young-at-heart

Marona’s Fantastic Tale: Marona is a mixed-breed Labrador whose life leaves deep traces among the humans she encounters. After an accident, she reflects on all the homes and different experiences she’s had. As Marona’s memory journeys into the past, her unfailing empathy and love brings lightness and innocence into each of her owners’ lives, in this beautiful and deeply emotional story of an average dog and her extraordinary life. (92 min / in Romanian and French with subtitles)
Critic’s Pick! Buoyant! A beautiful and original animated film. – The New York Times

Check out TheRyder.com for even more films.

The July edition of The Ryder magazine is on the virtual newsstands.
This month’s issue features some great reads:  Spike Lee’s new movie, K-pop fans as Political Activists, travel stories on Bulgaria and Ecuador, and a profile of IU student Jewher Ilham, whose father is a political prisoner in China.

Toy Story 4 – Friday Night in Bryan Park

Bring a blanket. Bring popcorn. Bring the dog. Bring hand sanitizer. Our summer outdoor screening series begins on Friday, July 17th with Toy Story 4 in Bryan Park. Seating is limited to 150. Social distancing and masks will be required. Since seating is limited, you might want to  register and reserve seats.

The gang is back. Woody, Buzz Lightyear and the rest of the gang embark on a road trip in Toy Story 4 with Bonnie and a new toy named Forky. The adventurous journey turns into an unexpected reunion as Woody’s slight detour leads him to his long-lost friend Bo Peep. Think of this as a more contemporary, family-friendly version of Jack Kerouac’s On The Road.

Toy Story 4 begins at dusk and is co-presented by the City of Bloomington Department of Parks and Recreation

There are lots of other good films playing in our virtual cinema. Bio-pics: Flannery O’Connor, Shirley Jackson, John Lewis, Joan of Arc. Murder mysteries: from France, The Girl With the Bracelet and from Italy, The Invisible Witness. And more – read short snappy descriptions of all of them right here

The July edition of The Ryder magazine is on the virtual newsstands.
This month’s issue features some great reads:  Spike Lee’s new movie, K-pop fans as Political Activists, travel stories on Bulgaria and Ecuador, and a profile of IU student Jewher Ilham, whose father is a political prisoner in China.

Click HERE to read the July edition!

Flannery and Shirley

Not to be confused with Laverne and Shirley … we are screening two films this weekend about major 20th century American writers: Flannery O’Connor and Shirley Jackson.

We’re also thrilled to present Peter Sellers “lost” comedy (and his only directorial effort) Mr. Topaze. Sellers stars as Auguste Topaze, a poor but proud schoolteacher. Unwilling to sacrifice his principles, he loses his job after refusing to alter the failing grades of one of students. Chances are there are at least a few of you who have found yourselves in similar situations (we’ll leave it to you to decide how to take that).

But that’s just the beginning – there are lots of other interesting films screening this week in our virtual theater.

Guest of Honour: This is the new film by Canadian filmmaker Adam Egoyan (The Sweet Hereafter). Acclaimed British actor David Thewlis stars as a Toronto health inspector who spends his days frequenting family-owned restaurants and wielding the power to shutter their dreams at the slightest provocation. But serving as a guardian angel for unsuspecting diners can’t begin to ease the conscience of a confused and conflicted man.

45 Arrests, 33 Years in Congress: It’s disheartening to think of how relevant this film is to our lives in the summer of 2020. There are few who can rival Georgia Congressman John Lewis and his 60 plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health care reform and immigration. The new film, John Lewis: Good Trouble, tells the story of this national treasure so that generations to come can continue to learn from Mr. Lewis’ remarkable story. The film also includes exclusive access to the Q&A between John Lewis and Oprah Winfrey, which plays at the end of the movie and an amazing panel discussion hosted by the Freedom Rides Museum and featuring Freedom Riders Dr. Bernard Lafayette and Dr. Rip Patton in conversation with director Dawn Porter, is archived and available to watch for free right through your ticketing page.

Do you like mysteries? We are featuring two delicious murder mysteries: one from Italy and one from France. Both will keep you guessing who is the true murderer until the very end.

THE INVISIBLE WITNESS:  A young, successful entrepreneur wakes up in a hotel room locked from the inside next to his dead lover. He becomes the chief suspect, While awaiting trial under house arrest, he enlists the aid of a defense attorney who has never lost a case. Largely told in flashback, this noirish thriller from director Stefano Mordini recreates the days of intrigue that lead up to that fateful night. Characters’ motivations begin to blur until no one is quite who they seem to be, leading to a pulse-pounding conclusion that will leave you guessing until the final shot.  (in Italian with subtitles; 102 minutes; 2020)

THE GIRL WITH A BRACELET: Lise is 18 years old and is accused of murdering her best friend two years earlier. She’s been under house arrest, wearing an ankle bracelet to monitor her whereabouts, hence the film’s title. As her trial starts, her parents stand by her side. But once her secret life is revealed in court, her innocence is far from certain and her parents’ faith begins to unravel. Directed by Stéphane Demoustier (in French with subtitles; 96 minutes; 2020)

Here’s a film for the young and the young-at-heart

Marona’s Fantastic Tale: Marona is a mixed-breed Labrador whose life leaves deep traces among the humans she encounters. After an accident, she reflects on all the homes and different experiences she’s had. As Marona’s memory journeys into the past, her unfailing empathy and love brings lightness and innocence into each of her owners’ lives, in this beautiful and deeply emotional story of an average dog and her extraordinary life. (92 min / in Romanian and French with subtitles)
Critic’s Pick! Buoyant! A beautiful and original animated film. – The New York Times

Check out TheRyder.com for even more films.

The July edition of The Ryder magazine is on the virtual newsstands.
This month’s issue features some great reads:  Spike Lee’s new movie, K-pop fans as Political Activists, travel stories on Bulgaria and Ecuador, and a profile of IU student Jewher Ilham, whose father is a political prisoner in China.


Click HERE to read the July edition

Do you have a comment or a suggestion for a film? Maybe you’d like to write something for our magazine. Send an email to editor@theryder.com. We can be talked into almost anything.

Shirley and Flannery

Shirley and Flannery

Shirley Jackson is perhaps best known for her short story, The Lottery (although her novel, The Haunting of Hill House, is widely considered a master class in how to write a ghost story). Elizabeth Moss gives an uncanny performance as the unconventional writer in the new movie, Shirley. Set in a small Vermont college town (Bennington), in the summer of 1964, Shirley and her husband (the influential literary critic and philandering college professor Stanley Hyman) offer to share their house with a young graduate student and his pregnant wife. The newly married couple have no idea what they’re in for.  At one point Shirley describes herself as a witch; Shirley (the movie) leaves us as giddy and unsettled as if we too were under her magical spell.

For those of you who have a special interest in films about female, mid-century American Gothic writers, we will be screening Flannery, the new documentary about Flannery O’Connor. We’ll have more on that next week when it opens on July 17th.

Also opening this weekend in our virtual theater: Guest of Honour, the new film by Canadian filmmaker Adam Egoyan (The Sweet Hereafter). Acclaimed British actor David Thewlis stars as a Toronto health inspector who spends his days frequenting family-owned restaurants and wielding the power to shutter their dreams at the slightest provocation. But serving as a guardian angel for unsuspecting diners can’t begin to ease the conscience of a confused and conflicted man.

45 Arrests, 33 Years in Congress: It’s disheartening to think of how relevant this film is to our lives in the summer of 2020. There are few who can rival Georgia Congressman John Lewis and his 60 plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health care reform and immigration. The new film, John Lewis: Good Trouble, opens nationally (and in our virtual cinema) on July 3rd. It tells the story of this national treasure so that generations to come can continue to learn from Mr. Lewis’ remarkable story.

We are featuring two delicious murder mysteries this week: one from Italy and one from France. Both will keep you guessing who is the true murderer until the very end.

THE INVISIBLE WITNESS:  (opens June 26) A young, successful entrepreneur wakes up in a hotel room locked from the inside next to his dead lover. He becomes the chief suspect, While awaiting trial under house arrest, he enlists the aid of a defense attorney who has never lost a case. Largely told in flashback, this noirish thriller from director Stefano Mordini recreates the days of intrigue that lead up to that fateful night. Characters’ motivations begin to blur until no one is quite who they seem to be, leading to a pulse-pounding conclusion that will leave you guessing until the final shot.  (in Italian with subtitles; 102 minutes; 2020)

THE GIRL WITH A BRACELET: Lise is 18 years old and is accused of murdering her best friend two years earlier. She’s been under house arrest, wearing an ankle bracelet to monitor her whereabouts, hence the film’s title. As her trial starts, her parents stand by her side. But once her secret life is revealed in court, her innocence is far from certain and her parents’ faith begins to unravel. Directed by Stéphane Demoustier (in French with subtitles; 96 minutes; 2020)

Here’s a film for the young and the young-at-heart

Marona’s Fantastic Tale: Marona is a mixed-breed Labrador whose life leaves deep traces among the humans she encounters. After an accident, she reflects on all the homes and different experiences she’s had. As Marona’s memory journeys into the past, her unfailing empathy and love brings lightness and innocence into each of her owners’ lives, in this beautiful and deeply emotional story of an average dog and her extraordinary life. (92 min / in Romaian and French with subtitles)
Critic’s Pick! Buoyant! A beautiful and original animated film. – The New York Times

Check out TheRyder.com for more films.

The July edition of The Ryder magazine is on the virtual newsstands.
This month’s issue features some great reads:  Spike Lee’s new movie, K-pop fans as Political Activists, travel stories on Bulgaria and Ecuador, and a profile of IU student Jewher Ilham, whose father is a political prisoner in China.

Click HERE to read the July edition!

Do you have a comment or a suggestion for a film? Maybe you’d like to write something for our magazine. Send an email to editor@theryder.com. We can be talked into almost anything.

The July issue of the ryder magazine is on the virtual newstands

Crimes of a Native Tongue: “To become an accidental advocate on the world stage for a father who is a political prisoner – and, by extension, for your entire people as well – is no easy task for anyone in the best of circumstance,” writes Filiz Cicek in Crimes of a Native Tongue. “For IU student Jewher Ilham, a teenage girl suddenly ripped from family moorings half-a-world away, unversed in any cultures or languages beyond her own, it might have been nearly impossible.” (there’s more to read in the July/August issue of The Ryder)

K-pop in the Age of Culture Wars: Most people who spend time online, particularly on Twitter, end up running into fans of Korean popular music. K-pop fans share photos or short videos of their faves with quips like “anyway, stan LOONA,” writes CedarBough T. Saeji. “They may not sound like serious political activists, but recent events have made news-watchers consider them in a new light. They flooded iWatch Dallas, the app set up by Texas law enforcement to prosecute protesters using citizen footage. K-pop fans instead presented the Dallas police department with their own citizen footage: thousands of videos of their favorite stars. Eventually, iWatch Dallas was forced to go off line. Similar approaches rendered white nationalist hashtags useless for organizing. ARMY, fans of the group BTS’s ARMY, flexed and donated $1 million to Black Lives Matter causes in just 24 hours. And then there was Donald Trump’s Tulsa rally…. (there’s even more to read in the July/August issue of The Ryder)

That’s not all.

The Vietnam War may be five decades old but the past is never far behind in Spike Lee’s new movie. Tom Prasch reviews Da 5 Bloods.

Many a soldier has gone to war believing in a cause. Ambrose Bierce emerged from combat realizing that the enemy of man is not so much other men but war itself. Jason Vest looks at the life and times of Indiana’s poet of the battlefield.

Jim Krause visits Ecuador, Mason Cassady gallivants around Bulgaria and Jeff Mease encourages us all to mask up in the July/August issue of The Ryder magazine.

We are normally supported by by paid advertising but that is not the case during the pandemic. There are no paid ads in this issue. The display ads that you will see as you flip through the magazine are published at no cost to the advertiser. And while it is true that by publishing electronically we are avoiding a printing bill, we do have other monthly expenses. And so if you see an article you like, or just want to support locally produced, independent journalism please consider making a donation.

45 Arrests, 33 years in congress

There are few who can rival Georgia Congressman John Lewis and his 60 plus years of social activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health care reform and immigration. The new film, John Lewis: Good Trouble, opens nationally (and in our virtual cinema) on July 3rd. It tells the story of this national treasure so that generations to come can continue to learn from Mr. Lewis’ remarkable story.

Through present day interviews as well as archival footage director Dawn Porter explores Lewis’ childhood, his inspiring family, and his fateful meeting with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr in 1957. Lewis was arrested more than 45 times, severely beaten and nearly killed while fighting for equality in the segregated deep South. His experiences and lessons regarding non-violent protest continue to shape his career today. The film also highlights Lewis’ many speeches and achievements, along with interviews from political leaders and Congressional colleagues who figure prominently in his life, all combined to illuminate his continuing influence on American culture.

Wait! There’s more. There are lots of other good films playing this week including …

We are featuring two delicious murder mysteries this week: one from Italy and one from France. Both feature characters accused of murder and under house arrest, an apt metaphor for our lives in the summer of 2020.  

THE INVISIBLE WITNESS:  (opens June 26) A young, successful entrepreneur wakes up in a hotel room locked from the inside next to his dead lover. He becomes the chief suspect, While awaiting trial under house arrest, he enlists the aid of a defense attorney who has never lost a case. Largely told in flashback, this noirish thriller from director Stefano Mordini recreates the days of intrigue that lead up to that fateful night. Characters’ motivations begin to blur until no one is quite who they seem to be, leading to a pulse-pounding conclusion that will leave you guessing until the final shot.  (in Italian with subtitles; 102 minutes; 2020)

THE GIRL WITH A BRACELET: Lise is 18 years old and is accused of murdering her best friend two years earlier. She’s been under house arrest, wearing an ankle bracelet to monitor her whereabouts, hence the film’s title. As her trial starts, her parents stand by her side. But once her secret life is revealed in court, her innocence is far from certain and her parents’ faith begins to unravel. Directed by Stéphane Demoustier (in French with subtitles; 96 minutes; 2020)

Family Entertainment on a Holiday Weekend! Here’s a film for the young and the young-at-heart

Marona’s Fantastic Tale: Marona is a mixed-breed Labrador whose life leaves deep traces among the humans she encounters. After an accident, she reflects on all the homes and different experiences she’s had. As Marona’s memory journeys into the past, her unfailing empathy and love brings lightness and innocence into each of her owners’ lives, in this beautiful and deeply emotional story of an average dog and her extraordinary life. (92 min / in Romaian and French with subtitles)
Critic’s Pick! Buoyant! A beautiful and original animated film. – The New York Times

Check out TheRyder.com for more films.

Do you have a comment or a suggestion for a film? Maybe you’d like to write something for our magazine. Send an email to editor@theryder.com. We can be talked into almost anything.

Look for the July issue of The Ryder magazine tomorrow. In the meantime, It’s never too late to read the June issue; here’s a link.

House Arrest?

We are featuring two delicious murder mysteries this week in our virtual cinema, one from Italy and one from France. Both feature characters accused of murder and under house arrest, an apt metaphor for our lives in the summer of 2020.  

THE INVISIBLE WITNESS:  (opens June 26) A young, successful entrepreneur wakes up in a hotel room locked from the inside next to his dead lover. He becomes the chief suspect, While awaiting trial under house arrest, he enlists the aid of a defense attorney who has never lost a case. Largely told in flashback, this noirish thriller from director Stefano Mordini recreates the days of intrigue that lead up to that fateful night. Characters’ motivations begin to blur until no one is quite who they seem to be, leading to a pulse-pounding conclusion that will leave you guessing until the final shot.  (in Italian with subtitles; 102 minutes; 2020)

THE GIRL WITH A BRACELET: Lise is 18 years old and is accused of murdering her best friend two years earlier. She’s been under house arrest, wearing an ankle bracelet to monitor her whereabouts, hence the film’s title. As her trial starts, her parents stand by her side. But once her secret life is revealed in court, her innocence is far from certain and her parents’ faith begins to unravel. Directed by Stéphane Demoustier (in French with subtitles; 96 minutes; 2020)

Wait! There’s more. There are lots of other good films playing this week including …

Race in America: We are screening three films that explore and bring a fresh and radical perspective to the current racial narrative in America. Two of these were shown in our series when they were originally released – I Am Not Your Negro and Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am. They are both well worth a second look. The third, Whose Streets? , is one that we overlooked when it was released in 2017. We are donating our portion of the ticket sales (just under 50%) to causes and organizations addressing longstanding injustices: police reform initiatives, The Bail Project, The Movement for Black Lives and Black Lives Matter.

Pioneers of Queer Cinema: three German classics from the 1920s and 30s that were landmarks in the early history of queer cinema: Madchen in Uniform, Michael, and Victor and Victoria

Proud: In 1981, it was still illegal to be gay in France. Today, same-sex marriage is recognized and has paved the way for legalizing the adoption of children by LGBTQ families. Proud tells the story of Charles, Victor and Diego, three generations of the same family who represent the seismic social changes that took place in just three decades.

In My Blood It Runs: This film could not be more timely. – The Washington Post Dujuan is a 10-year-old Arrernte boy from Mparntwe (Alice Springs) in Australia. Full of life and exuberance, he learns, with the support of his loving mother and grandmother, to hunt, speak two Indigenous languages, and become a healer.

Joan of Arc: Lise Leplat Prudhomme stars as the child-warrior. French filmmaker Bruno Dumont injects this heroine’s timeless cause and ideology with a modernity that highlights the fervor, strength and freedom women show when shackled by patriarchal societies and archaic virile customs.

The Wolf House an animated feature that tells the story of a young girl who escapes a cult colony of religious fanatics during Chile’s darkest years under rule of military dictator, Augusto Pinochet.

A White, White Day Iceland’s submission to the Academy for Best International Feature Film … a police officer on bereavement leave after the sudden loss of his wife in an apparent accident searches for someone to blame. He zeroes in on a neighbor whom he suspects may have had an affair with his wife. As past memories take on new meaning, his suspicion turns obsessive and imperils those around him.

Do you have a comment or a suggestion for a film? Maybe you’d like to write something for our magazine. Send an email to editor@theryder.com. We can be talked into almost anything.

Look for the July issue of The Ryder magazine next week.

If you have not seen our June issue, here’s a link.

Murders Most Foul

Do you like mysteries? We’re screening a pair of delicious murder mysteries this month: one from France and one from Italy. . . .

The Girl With a Bracelet (opens June 19) Lise is 16 years old and is accused of murdering her best friend. As her trial starts, her parents stand right by her side. But once her secret life is revealed in court, her innocence is far from certain and her parents’ faith begins to unravel. Directed by Stéphane Demoustier (in French with subtitles; 96 minutes; 2020)

The Invisible Witness (opens June 26) A locked-room mystery with a twist: A slickly successful businessman wakes up next to his dead lover and becomes the chief suspect. His defense lawyer’s never lost a case, but can even she help him? Largely told in flashback, this noirish thriller from director Stefano Mordini recreates the days of intrigue that lead up to that fateful night. Characters’ motivations begin to blur until no one is quite who they seem to be, leading to a pulse-pounding conclusion that will leave you guessing until the final shot.  (Italy; subtitled; 2020)


Wait! There’s more. There are lots of other good films playing this week including …

Race in America: We are screening three films that explore and bring a fresh and radical perspective to the current racial narrative in America. Two of these were shown in our series when they were originally released – I Am Not Your Negro and Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am. They are both well worth a second look. The third, Whose Streets? , is one that we overlooked when it was released in 2017. We are donating our portion of the ticket sales (just under 50%) to causes and organizations addressing longstanding injustices: police reform initiatives, The Bail Project, The Movement for Black Lives and Black Lives Matter.

Pioneers of Queer Cinema: three German classics from the 1920s and 30s that were landmarks in the early history of queer cinema: Madchen in Uniform, Michael, and Victor and Victoria

Proud: In 1981, it was still illegal to be gay in France. Today, same-sex marriage is recognized and has paved the way for legalizing the adoption of children by LGBTQ families. Proud tells the story of Charles, Victor and Diego, three generations of the same family who represent the seismic social changes that took place in just three decades.

In My Blood It Runs: This film could not be more timely. – The Washington Post Dujuan is a 10-year-old Arrernte boy from Mparntwe (Alice Springs) in Australia. Full of life and exuberance, he learns, with the support of his loving mother and grandmother, to hunt, speak two Indigenous languages, and become a healer

Capital in the 21st Century: a film that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress, and shines a new light on today’s growing inequalities

Joan of Arc: Lise Leplat Prudhomme stars as the child-warrior. French filmmaker Bruno Dumont injects this heroine’s timeless cause and ideology with a modernity that highlights the fervor, strength and freedom women show when shackled by patriarchal societies and archaic virile customs.

Mysteries of Lisbon: Portuguese filmmaker Raul Ruiz’s six-part mini-series evokes the complex intertwined narratives of Victor Hugo and Charles Dickens. It is One of the first cinematic masterpieces of this century – Film Comment

Santiago, Italia Italian filmmaker Nanni Moretti tells a story that many viewers may not know about: the efforts of the Italian Embassy to save the citizens of Chile targeted by the fascist regime of Augusto Pinochet.

The Wolf House an animated feature that tells the story of a young girl who escapes a cult colony of religious fanatics during Chile’s darkest years under rule of military dictator, Augusto Pinochet.

A White, White Day Iceland’s submission to the Academy for Best International Feature Film … a police officer on bereavement leave after the sudden loss of his wife in an apparent accident searches for someone to blame. He zeroes in on a neighbor whom he suspects may have had an affair with his wife. As past memories take on new meaning, his suspicion turns obsessive and imperils those around him.

Do you have a comment or a suggestion for a film? Maybe you’d like to write something for our magazine. Send an email to editor@theryder.com. We can be talked into almost anything.

Here’s a link to the June issue of The Ryder

3 Films by Hong sangsoo

Korean filmmaker Hong Sangsoo has made 21 deceptively buoyant, morally inquisitive films and is a regular at Cannes. Few of his films, however, have reached the States (although some of you saw The Day After when we screened it in 2018). Film distribution can be capricious – three of Hong Sangsoo’s films are finally being released this month . . .

YOURSELF AND YOURS – opens June 5 – Hong’s new film (made in 2016 but finally released in the States this week) is one of his most delightful comic mysteries. When a young, idealistic painter, Youngsoo,  learns that his girlfriend was recently seen having drinks with another guy, he can’t help but question her about it. It doesn’t go well. Yourself and Yours is clever puzzle of misconstrued meanings, unintended consequences and mistaken identities. (2020; 86 min)

CRITIC’S PICK! Hong puts you in tune with his world of his sad-sack characters. By the end, we may suspect that one character has found an entirely novel and effective way of resetting a romantic relationship. Or that something weirder and creepier is going on. The pleasure is in not quite knowing. – NY Times


HILL OF FREEDOM – opens June 12 Returning to Seoul after a long, restorative trip, a woman is given packet of letters from her boyfriend who has come to propose to her. But she drops the undated letters before she has read them and they scatter about. When she reads them, she has to make sense of the chronology… and so must we. Shot in the narrow alleys, petite cafes and beautiful hanok inns of Seoul’s historic Jong-ro district, a favorite Hong location, Hill of Freedom is a masterful, alternately funny and haunting, tale of love and longing from the great  director. (2014; 67 minutes)

CRITICS PICK! -The New York Times

“A masterwork. Achieves a complexity akin to the grand historical meditations of Alain Resnais. Ingeniously constructed. I’ve watched it three times forwards and one time backwards and I feel as if I’m just beginning to get the hang of it.” — Richard Brody, The New Yorker


WOMAN ON THE BEACH – opens June 19 – Joong-rae, a filmmaker suffering from writer’s block, takes a trip to the coast with his production designer Chang-wook, who brings along the vivacious Moon-sook. Soon after their arrival, Moon-sook falls for Joong-rae. Our fickle hero however cannot commit. What had been a sardonic Jules and Jim turns into a burlesque Vertigo when Joong-rae returns to the coastal resort and attempts to recreate the original romance with a woman who resembles Moon-sook, until his jilted lover shows up… (2006; 126 min)

Also playing in our virtual cinema

Race in America: We are screening three films that explore and bring a fresh and radical perspective to the current racial narrative in America. Two of these were shown in our series when they were originally released – I Am Not Your Negro and Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am. They are both well worth a second look. The third, Whose Streets? , is one that we overlooked when it was released in 2017. We are donating our portion of the ticket sales (just under 50%) to causes and organizations addressing longstanding injustices: police reform initiatives, The Bail Project, The Movement for Black Lives and Black Lives Matter.

Pioneers of Queer Cinema: three German classics from the 1920s and 30s that were landmarks in the early history of queer cinema: Madchen in Uniform, Michael, and Victor and Victoria

Capital in the 21st Century: a film that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress, and shines a new light on today’s growing inequalities

Joan of Arc: Lise Leplat Prudhomme stars as the child-warrior. French filmmaker Bruno Dumont injects this heroine’s timeless cause and ideology with a modernity that highlights the fervor, strength and freedom women show when shackled by patriarchal societies and archaic virile customs.

Mysteries of Lisbon: Portuguese filmmaker Raul Ruiz’s six-part mini-series evokes the complex intertwined narratives of Victor Hugo and Charles Dickens. It is One of the first cinematic masterpieces of this century – Film Comment

Santiago, Italia Italian filmmaker Nanni Moretti tells a story that many viewers may not know about: the efforts of the Italian Embassy to save the citizens of Chile targeted by the fascist regime of Augusto Pinochet.

The Wolf House an animated feature that tells the story of a young girl who escapes a cult colony of religious fanatics during Chile’s darkest years under rule of military dictator, Augusto Pinochet.

A White, White Day Iceland’s submission to the Academy for Best International Feature Film … a police officer on bereavement leave after the sudden loss of his wife in an apparent accident searches for someone to blame. He zeroes in on a neighbor whom he suspects may have had an affair with his wife. As past memories take on new meaning, his suspicion turns obsessive and imperils those around him.

Do you have a comment or a suggestion for a film? Maybe you have an idea for an article in our magazine? Send an email to editor@theryder.com. We can be talked into almost anything.

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