Race in America: 3 films

We are screening three films that explore and bring a fresh and radical perspective to the current racial narrative in America. Two of these were shown in our series when they were originally released – I Am Not Your Negro and Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am. They are both well worth a second look. The third, Whose Streets? , is one that we overlooked when it was released in 2017. We are donating our portion of the ticket sales (just under 50%) to causes and organizations addressing longstanding injustices: police reform initiatives, The Bail Project, The Movement for Black Lives and Black Lives Matter. You can watch all three films here

We will also be screening the upcoming documentary John Lewis: Good Trouble when it is released on July 4th.

Also Playing:

Capital in the 21st Century: a film that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress, and shines a new light on today’s growing inequalities

Joan of Arc: Lise Leplat Prudhomme stars as the child-warrior. French filmmaker Bruno Dumont injects this heroine’s timeless cause and ideology with a modernity that highlights the fervor, strength and freedom women show when shackled by patriarchal societies and archaic virile customs.

Mysteries of Lisbon: Portuguese filmmaker Raul Ruiz’s six-part mini-series evokes the complex intertwined narratives of Victor Hugo and Charles Dickens. It is One of the first cinematic masterpieces of this century – Film Comment

Santiago, Italia Italian filmmaker Nanni Moretti tells a story that many viewers may not know about: the efforts of the Italian Embassy to save the citizens of Chile targeted by the fascist regime of Augusto Pinochet.

The Wolf House an animated feature that tells the story of a young girl who escapes a cult colony of religious fanatics during Chile’s darkest years under rule of military dictator, Augusto Pinochet.

A White, White Day Iceland’s submission to the Academy for Best International Feature Film … a police officer on bereavement leave after the sudden loss of his wife in an apparent accident searches for someone to blame. He zeroes in on a neighbor whom he suspects may have had an affair with his wife. As past memories take on new meaning, his suspicion turns obsessive and imperils those around him.

Hong Sangsoo X 3 Korean filmmaker Hong Sangsoo has made 18 films and is a regular at Cannes. Some of you saw The Day After when we screened it in 2018. Now we are hosting a micro-festival of three of his films, including his just released Yourself and Yours.

Coming Soon:

Pioneers of Queer Cinema: three German classics from the 1920s and 30s that were landmarks in the early history of queer cinema: Madchen in Uniform, Michael, and Victor and Victoria

Willow Aldrich is a graduate of Edgewood High School; she took these photographs at this weekend’s protest marches in Bloomington.

Joan of arc, mysteries of lisbon – ryder films this week

Here’s what’s playing this week in our virtual cinema…

Mysteries of Lisbon

Raul Ruiz’s masterful adaptation of the classic Portuguese novel evokes the complex intertwined narratives of Victor Hugo and Charles Dickens and is “one of the first cinematic masterpieces of this century.” – Film Comment Find out more »

Joan of Arc – Q&A w/filmmaker on June 4th

Compelled by visions of God, young Joan leads the French charge against invading English forces. When she is captured, the Church sends her for trial on charges of heresy. Refusing to accept the accusations, the graceful Joan of Arc will stay true to her mission. Find out more »

A White, White Day

A bereft former police chief whose golden years are spent caring for his granddaughter and remodeling a house, begins to suspect a local man of having had an affair with his late wife. Filmmaker Hlynur Pálmason finds seemingly boundless new ways to capture the volatile climate, the elemental delights and estrangement of Iceland’s east coast, and the unpredictable nature of grief in A White, White Day. Find out more »

Santiago, Italia

In the early seventies, the world was watching as Chilean voters elected Socialist leader Salvador Allende. His political ideals and aspirations—among them providing education for all children and distributing land to the nation’s workers—terrified the country’s right-wing, as well as the U.S. Nanni Moretti tells a story many viewers may not know about: the efforts of the Italian Embassy to save and relocate citizens targeted by the fascist Pinochet regime in Chile. Find out more »

The Wolf House

The Wolf House is an animated feature that tells the story of a young girl who escapes a cult colony of religious fanatics during Chile’s darkest years under rule of military dictator, Augusto Pinochet. Find out more »

Mephisto

“What do they want from me now? After all, I am just an actor.” So how did an up-and-coming thespian with a mixed-race mistress and left-wing sympathies make it to the top of Nazi Germany’s theatrical world? Find out more »

New French Shorts 2020

A feature-length program of delightful, funny, charming, provocative festival favorite Gallic shorts. Find out more »

The Booksellers

Antiquarian booksellers — whose job requires the disparate skills of a scholar, a detective, and a businessperson — have personalities and knowledge bases that are as broad and deep as the material they handle. ​This Booksellers burrows deep inside their small but fascinating world, populated by an assortment of obsessives, intellects, oddballs and dreamers. Find out more »

Capital in the 21st Century

A lively, entertaining, and eye-opening look at the number one economic issue of our time
(and the 2020 elections) Find out more »

Why The Ryder need your support today

WHY THE RYDER NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT TODAY

Through the years, The Ryder has been generously supported by local shops and restaurants, many of them in the downtown arts district, many of them purchasing ad space simply because they wanted to support a community magazine. Their support has benefited not just the magazine, but also, indirectly, the Film Series. If you flip through the current issue of the magazine (or any of the other issues that we’ve published since the start of pandemic) you’ll see display ads for local stores, cafes and community organizations. But given the current economic environment, we have decided that it’s our turn to step up. And so all of the ads in these issues have been published at no cost to the advertisers. And while it is true that by publishing electronically we are avoiding a printing bill, we do have other monthly expenses.

Back in March, when we made the decision to publish the magazine without ad revenue, we thought the pandemic would be under control by September. Clearly, we were wrong about that. Today, with the end nowhere in sight, we are asking for your support to publish The Ryder into the spring.  Funds will be used to cover operating expenses and continue to keep paid staff employed until advertising revenue begins to steadily increase. 

Paying it forward – with your donation of $50 or more to The Ryder, you can designate a community organization of your choice — the Community Kitchen, Middle Way House, the Animal Shelter, Bloomington Playwrights Project, the Bloomington chapter of Black Lives Matter or any other local organization — and we can reciprocate, in a small way, by offering them complimentary space in the magazine to promote their own project or fundraiser. You can make a donation through our GoFundMe page. After your donation, let us know which organization you would like to support; simply send an email to peter@theryder.com THANK YOU!

june issue of the ryder

The new issue of The Ryder magazine is on the virtual newsstands …

How can you govern a barnyard of pets in French cheese country? Wandering writer Mason Cassady felt a mix of shock, excitement and disbelief in France, Belgium and Wales.

How much do you really know about truckers, especially 21st century truckers?   They are no longer good ole boys. John Linnemeier tells us that today’s drivers hail from all over the globe and come in all colors, shapes and sizes.

It seems like we’re all living in a never-ending on deck circle, but Emily Nemens’ new novel, Cactus League, gives even non-baseball fans reason to hope during the long, long rain delay. WFHB’s Emily Jackson steps up to the plate with an insightful review.

Neal Stephenson’s stories are about outsiders, smart characters looking at their world in syncopated time and threading their way through, often making it better in the process. Rachel Duel Hertz explains that Stephenson may be our best literary companion for this pandemic’s strange gift of separation and time.

Look Who’s Talking: Danielle McClelland The outgoing Executive Director of the Buskirk-Chumley talks about the past and the future of the theater

All of this in the current issue of The Ryder magazine

Why does The Ryder need your support?

Our business model for the past 40 years has been pretty simple: the magazine would always be free and supported by advertising. That is no longer possible. Not now, and not for the foreseeable future. The local shops and restaurants that are open are in no position to lend their financial support to a local arts magazine, as much as they might like to.

Yes, as you flip through this issue of The Ryder you will see display ads for community organizations and local restaurants. But those ads are included at no charge. And while we do not have a printing bill right now, we do have other expenses.

And so if you discover one or two articles that you like and if you are in a position to make a donation, it will be gratefully appreciated. No amount is too small. You’ll be helping to support local, independent journalism.

MAKE A DONATION

New Animation: The Wolf House

If you are a fan of animation you’ll want to see The Wolf House: the story of a young girl who escapes a cult colony of religious fanatics during Chile’s darkest years under rule of military dictator, Augusto Pinochet. (This is actually one of two films that we are opening this week about Chile during Pinochet’s rule; the other is Santiago, Italia.)

Look for a new issue of The Ryder magazine on virtual newsstands all over the internet.

And there’s still time to submit a short story for our upcoming issue.

There are lots of other exciting films streaming in our virtual theater including THE BOOKSELLERS, A WHITE, WHITE DAY and CAPITAL IN THE 21ST CENTURY

MEPHISTO AND FRENCH SHORTS 2020 OPEN FRIDAY

“What do they want from me now? After all, I am just an actor.” This is a line from Mephisto, the Academy Award winning film about an actor in Nazi Germany who makes a demonic deal to ensure his success on the stage. It also echoes a line often heard around the Ryder offices: “What do they want from me now? After all, I’m just a film programmer.” That said, we’ve entered no such Satanic arrangements. At least not yet. Mephisto opens on Friday. READ MORE

We’re also bringing in a delightful, funny, charming, provocative collection of festival-favorite Gallic shorts. READ MORE

HELD OVER

Capital in the 21st Century is based on the international bestseller by rock-star economist Thomas Piketty (which sold over three million copies worldwide and landed Piketty on Time Magazine‘s list of most influential people), this entertaining documentary is an accessible journey through wealth and power, a film that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress. Picketty’s book has been acclaimed as “the most important economics book of the year — and maybe the decade.” – Paul Krugman, The New York Times READ MORE

Independent booksellers are not usually reaping the rewards of capitalism in the 21st century. But their love of books is rewarding in and of itself and besides, they lead rich, interior lives. The Booksellers is also on the virtual screen this week. And there’s a special offer from Caveat Emptor for those who see the film… READ MORE

A White, White Day was Iceland’s nominee for an Academy Award for Best International Feature Film. A psychological thriller from Iceland, A White, White Day will surprise you at every turn. READ MORE

Also on the screen this week – The Wild Goose Lake and Slay The Dragon

Bloomington’s Charlotte Zietlow has some good ideas on how to make city and county government work better. And she writes about them in the current issue of The Ryder magazine. If you haven’t picked up a copy of the April/May Ryder yet, you’re missing out: here it is

We’re still accepting submissions for our upcoming fiction issue. READ MORE

Ever wonder how rich people get rich?

Capital in the 21st Century, currently playing in our virtual theater, answers that question and more. Based on the international bestseller by rock-star economist Thomas Piketty (which sold over three million copies worldwide and landed Piketty on Time Magazine‘s list of most influential people), this entertaining documentary is an accessible journey through wealth and power, a film that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress. Picketty’s book has been acclaimed as “the most important economics book of the year — and maybe the decade.” – Paul Krugman, The New York Times READ MORE

Do you know who doesn’t get rich…? Independent booksellers. But their love of books is rewarding in and of itself and besides, they lead rich, interior lives. And a few of them actually make some money.  The Booksellers is also on the virtual screen this week. And there’s a special offer from Caveat Emptor for those who see the film… READ MORE

A White, White Day was Iceland’s nominee for an Academy Award for Best International Feature Film and it is screening now in our virtual theater. A psychological thriller from Iceland, A White, White Day will surprise you at every turn. READ MORE

Also on the screen this week – The Wild Goose Lake and Slay The Dragon

Linda Poteat worked at the Irish Lion the the 1990s. Today she’s a United Nations director fighting pandemics around the world. If you haven’t picked up a copy of the April/May Ryder magazine yet, you’re missing out: here it is

We’re still accepting submissions for our upcoming fiction issue. There are very few certainties in life but one of them is you’ll never get rich writing short stories. That said, if you still want to submit . . . READ MORE

A WHITE, WHITE DAY: one of two films opening at ryder

A White, White Day was shortlisted for an Academy Award for Best International Feature Film and it is opening Friday in our virtual theater. A psychological thriller from Iceland, A White, White Day will surprise you at every turn.

READ MORE

We are also opening the non-fiction film, Capital in the 21st Century. Based on the international bestseller by rock-star economist Thomas Piketty (which sold over three million copies worldwide and landed Piketty on Time Magazine‘s list of most influential people), this entertaining documentary is an accessible journey through wealth and power, a film that breaks the popular assumption that the accumulation of capital runs hand in hand with social progress. Picketty’s book has been acclaimed as “the most important economics book of the year — and maybe the decade.” – Paul Krugman, The New York Times

READ MORE

Don’t forget: We are also screening The Booksellers, The Wild Goose Lake and Slay The Dragon.

Now might be as good a time as any to dust off that short story that you started when you were an undergrad and get back to work on it. Here’s a way to fill those endless, empty hours with an activity that is might be a bit more rewarding than those reruns of Everybody Loves Raymond that you’ve been watching. It costs nothing to enter and if your story is selected, you’ll be showered in riches beyond your wildest dreams. READ MORE

The April/May issue is on the virtual newsstand. Read The Ryder Thanks , as always, for supporting local journalism.

An offer you can’t refuse from caveat emptor

Antiquarian booksellers have personalities and knowledge bases that are as broad and deep as the material they handle. ​ Their job requires the disparate skills of a scholar, a detective, and a businessperson. (The same can be said about the skills of the film programmers at The Ryder, minus the “businessperson” part.) D.W. Young’s new film burrows deep inside the fascinating world of booksellers, a community populated by an lovable assortment of obsessives, intellects, oddballs and dreamers. The Booksellers opens in The Ryder’s virtual theater on Friday. READ MORE ABOUT THE BOOKSELLERS

Our amazing local bookstore, Caveat Emptor, is offering Ryder filmgoers a deal that’s hard to pass up. They will match any purchase dollar-for-dollar with store credit. So if you buy $20 worth of books, you will get $20 in store credit towards a future purchase. Just show them your receipt from your ticket to The Booksellers.

And while we’re on the subject of books and bookstores, we’re accepting submissions for our annual short story issue.

Now might be as good a time as any to dust off that short story that you started when you were an undergrad and get back to work on it. Here’s a way to fill those endless, empty hours with an activity that is might be a bit more rewarding than those reruns of Everybody Loves Raymond that you’ve been watching. It costs nothing to enter and if your story is selected, you’ll be showered in riches beyond your wildest dreams. READ MORE

Do you like books? ‘The Booksellers’ opens on friday

Antiquarian booksellers have personalities and knowledge bases that are as broad and deep as the material they handle. ​ Their job requires the disparate skills of a scholar, a detective, and a businessperson. The same can be said about the skills of the film programmers at The Ryder, minus the “businessperson” part. D.W. Young’s new film burrows deep inside the fascinating world of booksellers, a community populated by an lovable assortment of obsessives, intellects, oddballs and dreamers. The Booksellers opens in The Ryder’s virtual theater on Friday. READ MORE ABOUT THE BOOKSELLERS

And while we’re on the subject of books, we’re accepting submissions for our annual short story issue.

Think about it . Dust off that short story that you started when you were an undergrad and get back to work on it. Here’s a way to fill those endless, empty hours with an activity that is might be a bit more rewarding than those reruns of Everybody Loves Raymond that you’ve been watching. It costs nothing to enter and if your story is selected, you’ll be showered in riches beyond your wildest dreams. READ MORE

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