In Balanchine’s Classroom: in our virtual theater

You can watch In Balanchine’s Classroom right here!

IN BALANCHINE’S CLASSROOM takes us back to the glory years of George Balanchine’s New York City Ballet through the remembrances of his former dancers and their quest to fulfill the vision of a genius. Opening the door to his studio, Balanchine’s private laboratory, they reveal new facets of the groundbreaking choreographer: taskmaster, mad scientist, and spiritual teacher. Today, as his former dancers teach a new generation, questions arise: what was the secret of his teaching? Can it be replicated?

Filled with never before seen archival footage of Balanchine at work during rehearsals, classes, and in preparation for his most seminal works, along with interviews with many of his adored and adoring dancers and those who try to carry on his legacy today, this is Balanchine as you have never seen him, and a film for anyone who loves ballet and the creative process.

Funded in part by the IU Jacobs School of Music.

Tickets: only $8

Where Are Films Shown?     Where Can I Park for free on Campus?     Any other Questions? Send an email to editor@TheRyder.com

Covid Protocols: Filmgoers must be vaccinated and must show proof of vaccination. This includes IU students, faculty and staff. (You can photograph your vaccination card and show it to us on your phone.)
Filmgoers must wear masks in the theater. Seating will be capped at 35% of capacity.


ALSO SCREENING IN OUR VIRTUAL THEATER: DAYS

Fauci: Sept 24, 25, 26

Sept 24 and 25 at 6:45 at the IU Fine Arts Theater Last Chance! Sunday, Sept 26 at 5:15 at the IU Fine Arts Theater

Dubbed “America’s Doctor” by The New Yorker, Dr. Fauci has become America’s most unlikely cultural icon, with his signature blend of scientific acumen, candor, courage and integrity in the face of COVID-19. At times he’s surprisingly funny. He’s been affectionately spoofed by Oscar winner Brad Pitt and memorialized by Fauci fans who’ve put his face on everything from coffee mugs to candles. He’s a tireless and effective communicator who has captured hearts and minds across the nation and around the world for his willingness to speak truth to power during an unprecedented pandemic. But less is known about the journey that led him to where he is today. (2021 / 105 min)

Fauci is screening in just a handful of theaters. We were chosen primarily because of IU’s nationally recognized stance on vaccination and mask mandates.

Tickets: only $8
Where Are Films Shown?     Where Can I Park for free on Campus?     Any other Questions? Send an email to editor@TheRyder.com

Covid Protocols: Filmgoers must be vaccinated and must show proof of vaccination. This includes IU students, faculty and staff. (You can photograph your vaccination card and show it to us on your phone.)
Filmgoers must wear masks in the theater. Seating will be capped at 35% of capacity.

Never Gonna Snow Again: Sun, sept 12th

Sept 12 at 6:45 pm at the IU Fine Arts Theater

Poland’s submission to the 2021 Academy Awards has been compared to Twin Peaks!

On a gray, foggy morning outside a large Polish city, a masseur from the East named Zhenia enters the lives of the wealthy residents of a gated community. With his hypnotic presence and quasi-magical abilities, he is able to get a residence permit and starts plying his trade. The well-to-do residents in their cookie-cutter suburban homes seemingly have it all, but they all suffer from an inner sadness, some unexplained longing. The attractive and mysterious newcomer’s hands heal, and Zhenia’s eyes seem to penetrate their souls. To them, his Russian accent sounds like a song from the past, a memory of simpler times. Directed by Malgorzata Szumowska and Michal Englert (2021; Poland; 113 min)

Tickets: only $6

Covid Protocols: Filmgoers must be vaccinated and must show proof of vaccination. This includes IU students, faculty and staff. (You can photograph your vaccination card and show it to us on your phone.)
Filmgoers must wear masks in the theater. Seating will be capped at 35% of capacity.


Where Are Films Shown?     Where Can I Park for free on Campus?     Any other Questions? Send an email to editor@TheRyder.com

zOOTOPIA: fREE sCREENING IN bRYAN pARK ON sEPT 10

Friday, Sept 10 at 8:30 in Bryan ParkFree!

The modern mammal metropolis of Zootopia is a city like no other. Comprised of habitat neighborhoods like ritzy Sahara Square and frigid Tundratown, it’s a melting pot where animals from every environment live together—a place where no matter what you are, from the biggest elephant to the smallest shrew, you can be anything. But when optimistic Officer Judy Hopps arrives, she discovers that being the first bunny on a police force of big, tough animals isn’t so easy. Determined to prove herself, she jumps at the opportunity to crack a case, even if it means partnering with a fast-talking, scam-artist fox, Nick Wilde, to solve the mystery. (2016 / 108 min)

Zootopia is brimming with silly slapstick humor and terrific one-liners — and yes, some simple yet valuable lessons about tolerance and prejudice and learning to embrace our differences. –Chicago Sun-Times

‘DAYS’ – nOW PLAYING IN OUR VIRTUAL tHEATER

You can watch DAYS right here, right now, in our virtual theater

Although we are once again showing films in person, on campus, we will continue to add films to our calendar that will screen in our virtual theater.

The great Taiwanese filmmaker Tsai Ming-liang has been directing exquisite examinations of alienation, isolation, and the fleeting beauty of human connection featuring his muse, Lee Kang-sheng, for decades. His latest film, DAYS, will undoubtedly stand as one of his best, sparest, and most intimate works. Lee once again stars as a variation on himself, wandering through a lonely urban landscape and seeking treatment in Hong Kong for a chronic illness; at the same time, a young Laotian immigrant working in Bangkok, played by Anong Houngheuangsy, goes about his daily routine. These two solitary men eventually come together in a moment of healing, tenderness, and sexual release. Among the most cathartic entries in Tsai’s filmography, DAYS is a work of longing, constructed with the director’s customary brilliance at visual composition and shot through with profound empathy. 

Among the most striking evocations of the quiet anguish of loneliness that any form of cinema can offer. — Glenn Kenny, The New York Times

Pure rapture. A full body massage for the soul.— Jonathan Romney, Film Comment

New Film from Chile: EMA – Last Chance! – Sept 10

Sept 10 at 7:30 at the Radio & TV Theater (1229 E. 7th St, next to the IU Fine Arts Theater). Not sure where to go? Come to Fine Arts and we will escort you.

Pablo Larraín’s erotic and suspenseful character study, Ema, is one of the most ambitious and visually stunning films of the year.” –The Playlist

Ema, a dancer, upends her family life and sets out on an odyssey of personal liberation. Renowned writer/director Pablo Larraín’s lusciously wild eighth film premiered at the Venice International Film Festival and has since enchanted audiences worldwide. Mariana Di Girolamo and Gael García Bernal star in this incendiary drama about art, desire, and the modern family.

(2021 / 107 min / Chile / in Spanish with subtitles)

Tickets: only $6

Covid Protocols: Filmgoers must be vaccinated and must show proof of vaccination. This includes IU students, faculty and staff. (You can photograph your vaccination card and show it to us on your phone.)
Filmgoers must wear masks in the theater. Seating will be capped at 35% of capacity.
Where Are Films Shown?     Where Can I Park for free on Campus?     Any other Questions? Send an email to editor@TheRyder.com

Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window: Fri in Bryan Park

Free Screening Friday Night in Bryan Park of Rear Window. Jimmy Stewart stars as a photo-journalist who is temporary confined to a wheelchair while recovering from a broken leg. He spends his time spying on his neighbors through the rear window of his Greenwich Village apartment and begins to suspect that one of them has murdered his wife. Grace Kelly co-stars in one of Alfred Hitchcock’s greatest films.

Call for Submissions: Ryder Fiction Issue

Our annual fiction issue is coming in October and we are reading submissions from Bloomington writers. This year’s fiction issue will have a Halloween theme. Send your best spooky short story to editor@theryder.com. Please put Fiction Submission in the subject line.

“Short” in this case means up to 5,000 words. Although we readily acknowledge that “we can be talked into almost anything,” in this case word length is not negotiable. The 5,001st word will not be considered, no matter how thrilling it might be.

Format: double-spaced in Word.

We look forward to reading your work!

GUNDA is “Spellbinding and Profoundly Moving”

You can watch Gunda right here, right now (FINAL NIGHT! JULY 15)

Experiential cinema in its purest form, Gunda chronicles the unfiltered lives of a mother pig (whom the film is named after), a flock of chickens, and a herd of cows with masterful intimacy. Gunda is a labor of love by Russian director Victor Kossakovsky Using stark, transcendent black and white cinematography and the farm’s ambient soundtrack, director Kossakovsky invites the audience to slow down and experience life as his subjects do, taking in their world with a magical patience and an other worldly perspective. Gunda asks us to meditate on the mystery of animal consciousness, and reckon with the role humanity plays in it. (Kossakovsky jokes that he discovered Gunda on a Norwegian farm, on what he refers to as “the first day of casting.”)  93 min

Gunda ― which doubles as the name of the movie and the name of the pig ― is as close as we may ever come to experiencing the world as animals do, specifically the animals that become our food. –Boston Globe

SPELLBINDING, SUBLIMELY BEAUTIFUL and PROFOUNDLY MOVING, Gunda offers you the opportunity to look — at animals, yes, but also at qualities that are often subordinated in narratively driven movies, at textures, shapes and light. These images testify that to see, really see, through the eyes of others, four-legged or otherwise, is to be fully human. CRITIC’S PICK! –The New York Times

jULY iSSUE OF THE rYDER mAGAZINE

Our July issue is on the virtual newsstands. Here is your hand-delivered copy. There’s some good stuff in this month’s issue including:

Where Do We Go When We Die?

The ongoing Covid-19 catastrophe has tasked us to confront mortality on a daily basis. By Pennfield Jensen

Friday Night at Dinky’s

Dinky’s is the name and auction is the game at this Amish-owned-and-operated institution in Daviess County. The auctions take place inside two of the biggest barns you might ever see and attract hundreds of bargain-seekers from far and wide. By Mason Cassady

Middle Way House: Candid Conversations 

We are running a series of interviews with Middle Way members in recognition of the domestic violence shelter’s 50th Anniversary. This month features conversations with Penny Gaither and Cindy Houston. “I lived in fear,” Penny says about her life before joining Middle Way. Cindy Houston’s dream is that one day we can “close the shelter, because nobody needs it.” Interviews by Robert F. Arnove


We hope to resume weekly, in-person film screenings in August when campus re-opens (assuming there are no surprises). We may also resume the print edition of the magazine. Let’s all cross our fingers and keep them crossed.

In the meantime, please keep the Film Series and The Ryder magazine going and consider making a donation

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