Benedetta Jan 21, 22, 23

Jan 14, 15, 21, 22 at 7pm at the IU Fine Arts Theater • Sunday Matinees Jan 16 and 23 at 3pm at the IU Fine Arts Theater • Purchase Tickets

Benedetta is inspired by the true story of Benedetta Carlini, a 17th century nun who as a child in the convent was told, “You are an intelligent girl…but intelligence can be dangerous.” She believed she saw visions of Christ and in fact, came to believe she was Jesus’ bride. Her erotic desires resulted in a forbidden love affair with another woman. Wildly entertaining, Benedetta is directed by Dutch auteur/provocateur Paul Verhoeven (best known in the States for RoboCop and Basic Instinct) in his signature salacious style, featuring standout performances from Virginie Efira as the title character and Charlotte Rampling as the stoic, conflicted Mother Abbess. 2021 • France/Belgium/Netherlands • 141 min

Verhoeven brings more vitality to his work than many filmmakers half his age. AN UNHOLY GOOD TIME! – The New York Times

At Cannes, in my press screening, the movie was received with shocked laughter and applause, and at the larger Lumiere screening, a five-minute standing ovation. – Vulture

A GRAND SUMMATION of all the director’s ideas about eroticism, rationality, moral ambiguity, and faith.  – RogerEbert.com

the hidden life of trees: jan 7, 8 & 9

Back By Popular Demand! Jan 7 & 8 at 6:45 at the IU Fine Arts Theater     Sunday Matinee! Jan 9 at 4pm at IU Fine Arts

Are trees able to talk? Do they have a memory and a social life? The forester and bestselling author Peter Wohlleben gets to the bottom of these questions and opens our eyes to the hidden world of the woods.

The whole world is talking about the environment, but frequently fails to listen to nature itself. Peter Wohlleben has changed all that: in The Hidden Life of Trees he opens our eyes to the hidden world of the woods. When Peter Wohlleben published his book in 2015, he stormed all the bestseller charts; no-one had ever written about the German woods and recognized trees as living in solidarity as part of a community.

We humans can only survive if the woods are healthy. The eleventh hour may already be upon us.

Germany / 2021 / 96 min)

Tickets: only $8

Covid Protocols: Filmgoers must be vaccinated and must show proof of vaccination. This includes IU students, faculty and staff. (You can photograph your vaccination card and show it to us on your phone.)
Filmgoers must wear masks in the theater. Seating will be capped at 35% of capacity.


Where Are Films Shown?     Where Can I Park for free on Campus?     Any other Questions? Send an email to editor@TheRyder.com

WHEEL OF FORTUNE AND FANTASY: jan 7, 8 & 9

January 7 and 8 at 7:30 at the IU Radio & Television Theater   Sunday Matinee! Jan 9 at 3pm IU Radio & Television

In this evocative triptych — three taut stories set in Tokyo about the mysteries and depths of women’s desires — coincidence seems as natural as the passing of time, and both are depicted in equal measure as whimsical and sharp: A fashion model discovers her friend is dating the ex who may have been her true love; a college student attempts to avenge humiliation by enlisting his lover to lure his sadistic professor into a “Me Too” situation; two middle-aged women make a poignant, enigmatic connection. Filmmaker Ryûsuke Hamaguchi homes in on deceptively simple moments, finely sketched to reveal the strangeness of true intimacy.

2021 / 120 min / in Japanese with subtitles / Coming in January: Ryûsuke Hamaguchi ‘s Drive My Car

“Critic’s Pick. The geometry of desire is elegantly plotted… a wistful, moving, outwardly unassuming movie… (by) one of the more intriguing filmmakers to emerge in the last decade…”
– Manohla Dargis, The New York Times

“Ingenious, playful, sparklingly acted and thoroughly entertaining portmanteau collection. Elegant and amusing, with a delicacy of touch and real imaginative warmth. An invigorating experience.”
– Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian (UK)

Tickets: only $8

Covid Protocols: Filmgoers must be vaccinated and must show proof of vaccination.

Filmgoers must wear masks in the theater. Seating will be capped at 35% of capacity.


Where Are Films Shown?     Where Can I Park for free on Campus?     Any other Questions? Send an email to editor@TheRyder.com

WILDLAND: Dec 17, and 18

Dec 17 and 18 at 6:30 at the IU Fine Arts Theater
Scandi noir! Sidse Babett Knudsen stars as kindly Aunt Bodil (a 180-degree reversal from her role as the morally impeccable Danish Prime Minister in the TV series Borgen), who provides a home for her orphaned teen-aged niece. As it turns out, her smiling aunt is the grande dame of a ruthless crime family. Sandra Guldberg Kampp is riveting as an emotionally fragile, grieving young woman who is grateful to her new relations but conflicted about their enterprise.
2021 • Denmark • in Danish with subtitles • 88 min

Check out some other exciting Ryder films playing this weekend!

LUZZO: Dec 17 and 18

Dec 17 and 18 at 8:30 at the IU Fine Arts Theater
A hardworking Maltese fisherman, Jesmark, is faced with an agonizing choice. He can repair his leaky luzzu – a traditional, multicolored wooden fishing boat – in the hopes of eking out a meager living at sea for his wife and newborn son, just as his father and father’s father did before him. Or he could cast his lot with a sinister black-market operation that is decimating the Mediterranean fish population and the livelihoods of the local families who depend on it. Luzzu heralds the arrival of writer-director-editor Alex Camilleri, a gripping storyteller in the neorealist tradition of early Luchino Visconti and the Dardenne brothers and and calls to mind the work of the film’s producer Ramin Bahrani (Man Push CartThe White Tiger). Nonporofessional actor Jesmark Scicluna, a real-life Maltese fisherman, won an award at Sundance for his extraordinary performance. Malta / 95 min / in Maltese with subtitles

There are more exciting Ryder films playing this weekend!

THE VILLAGE DETECTIVE: Dec 10, 11

Dec 10 and 11 at 7pm at the IU Fine Arts Theater
During the summer of 2016, a fishing boat off the shores of Iceland made a most curious catch: four reels of 35mm film, seemingly of Soviet provenance. The film turned out to be an incomplete print of a popular Soviet comedy from 1969, water damaged no less. Did that mean it had no value? Filmmaker Bill Morrison thought not. (Some of you saw his film Dawson City, Frozen Time when we screened it in 2017) Morrison makes movies from ghostly fragments of lost films. He uses these four reels as a jumping off point for his latest meditation on cinema’s past, offering a journey into Soviet history and film accompanied by a gorgeous score by Pulitzer and Grammy-winning composer David Lang. 2021 • in English and in Russian with subtitles • 81 min
Morrison’s movies feel like half-remembered reveries formed from memories you can no longer consciously recall. Hovering at the intersection of reappropriation, preservation, history, music, and art, any one of his works will haunt you for the rest of your life. – Hyperallergic

There are more exciting Ryder films playing this weekend!

Covid Protocols: Filmgoers must be vaccinated and must show proof of vaccination. This includes IU students, faculty and staff. (You can show us your vaccination card us on your phone.)
Filmgoers must wear masks in the theater. Seating will be capped at 35% of capacity.
Where Are Films Shown?     Where Can I Park for free on Campus?     Any other Questions? Send an email to editor@TheRyder.com

La Piscine (The Swimming Pool): Nov 12, 13, 19 & 20

Nov 12, 13, 19 and 20 at 8:30 at the IU Fine Arts Theater

Sexual tension simmers on the French Riviera in this late-’60s, Euro-chic erotic thriller. Jane Birkin stars alongside Alain Delon, Romy Schneider, and Maurice Ronet as a quartet of tanned, toned, beautiful people who spend their summer swimming, lounging the pool (la piscine) and trysting with one another amid the crystal-blue waters of the Côte d’Azur. But jealousy and a creeping sense of unease gradually infect their languorous idyll. Director Jacques Deray and co-writer Jean-Claude Carrière deliver a sultry, sun-baked master class in slow-burn suspense.

123 min / In French with English subtitles.

Restored in 4K from the original 35mm negative.

Critic’s Pick! – The New York Times

Swan Song: Nov 12, 13, 19 & 20

Nov 12, 13, 19 and 20 at 7:30 at the IU Radio & TV Theater
A retired hairdresser has given up on life and now lives in a nursing home in Sandusky, Ohio. But when he gets word that a former client’s dying wish was for him to style her final hairdo, he sets out on an epic journey across Sandusky to confront the ghosts of his past–and collect the beauty supplies necessary for the job.

The legendary German character actor Udo Kier stars. (Kier’s acting career goes back to the 1960s and the films of Werner Herzog and Rainer Werner Fassbinder.) Linda Evans co-stars Her career also dates back to the early ’60s–anyone remember The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet?

Directed by Todd Stephens, Swan Song is a comical and bittersweet journey about rediscovering oneself and looking gorgeous while doing so.

(2021 • 105 min)

Kier gets the role of his lifetime as a fabulously snarky, acerbic, long-retired hairdresser. – IndieWire

Tickets: only $8

Covid Protocols: Filmgoers must be vaccinated and must show proof of vaccination. This includes IU students, faculty and staff. (You can photograph your vaccination card and show it to us on your phone.)
Filmgoers must wear masks in the theater. Seating will be capped at 35% of capacity.


Where Are Films Shown?     Where Can I Park for free on Campus?     Any other Questions? Send an email to editor@TheRyder.com

“The Velvet Underground” nov 5, 6 and 7

November 5, 6 and 7 at 8:30 at the IU Fine Arts Theater

Back By Popular Demand!

Todd Haynes’s new film about the seminal band, The Velvet Underground, mirrors its members’ experimentation and formal innovation. Combining contemporary interviews and archival documentation with newscasts, advertisements, and a trove of avant-garde film from the era, Haynes constructs a vibrant cinematic collage that is as much about the New York of the ’60s and ’70s as it is about the rise and fall of the band. Haynes unearths rich details about Andy Warhol, The Factory, Nico, and others, adding vivid context and texture that never diminish the ultimate enigma of the group that has been called as influential as the Beatles. 2021 • 120 min

Tickets: only $8

Covid Protocols: Filmgoers must be vaccinated and must show proof of vaccination. This includes IU students, faculty and staff. (You can photograph your vaccination card and show it to us on your phone.)
Filmgoers must wear masks in the theater. Seating will be capped at 35% of capacity.
Where Are Films Shown?     Where Can I Park for free on Campus?     Any other Questions? Send an email to editor@TheRyder.com

(2021 / 120 min)

“Critic’s Pick!” – The New York Times (Oct 15) Read the full review

Tickets: only $8

Covid Protocols: Filmgoers must be vaccinated and must show proof of vaccination. This includes IU students, faculty and staff. (You can photograph your vaccination card and show it to us on your phone.)
Filmgoers must wear masks in the theater. Seating will be capped at 35% of capacity.
 

Universal May Just Deliver New Monster Classics

by Mirabelle Peabody

In recent years we’ve witnessed the hugely successful re-invention of the Marvel franchise with the introduction of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Films are now intertwined with each other, although not titled concurrently. There have been hints of this for at least a few years; some may not have noticed that Universal had something similar on its mind when they announced the DarkUniverse in a tweet.

Witness the beginning of a #DarkUniverse. pic.twitter.com/8g9eIbQfGa

— #DarkUniverse (@darkuniverse) May 22, 2017

Tom Cruise would be The Mummy, Johnny Depp The Invisible Man, Javier Bardem as Frankenstein’s monster and Russell Crowe would do double-duty as both Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. That sounded pretty impressive on the face of it, but following the failure of The Mummy reboot, the Dark Universe idea suddenly slipped into the shadows.

It was arguably best that the plan didn’t come to fruition back in 2017; after all, there are certainly more deserving characters and movies that would fit better like Horror of Dracula. After all, if you consider the two titles in isolation there’s no way The Mummy would be more revered than Dracula, although the Mummy is a classic in its own right with the original movie appearing just a year after Dracula first surfaced.

There is still an opportunity though that Universal could grab with both hands. Just look at some of those aforementioned classic characters. Frankenstein and Dracula are massive and are synonymous with horror, there’s not anyone who doesn’t know who they are.

Add to that the availability of the classics on streaming platforms including on the YouTube Fear: The Home of Horror channel, which has been showing classic Universal Monster movies since January for free. The presence of these characters is constant; they are always relevant in popular culture. Moreover, they cut across other genres of entertainment, with Dracula popping up on one of the most popular video games, Castlevania for example. Dracula appeared in Symphony of the Night; it was even adapted into an award winning Netflix series and it doesn’t stop there. Dracula and Frankenstein-based slots are common across slot sites, and Dr. Jekyll even makes an appearance in the “Dr. Jekyll Goes Wild” game hosted on Gala Casino.

Alongside the digital and gaming platforms there’s now Universal’s streaming service, Peacock, which promises to keep things firmly in your mind’s eye. On Peacock you will find originals such as Bride of Frankenstein and the original 1933 version of The Invisible Man and more.

Last year saw the revival of the Invisible Man and even in a stop start year hit by the pandemic, worldwide box office receipts for the Leigh Whannel directed movie stood at over $140m. It demonstrates the hunger for reboots of these classics and proves that there really isn’t a need for there to be a thread linking them together. Nor do they don’t need to command a massive budget to make a successful movie. The Invisible Man which was made for a relatively moderate $7m; compare that to the $120m+ outlay on The Mummy which made $409m worldwide.

Next up for a modern day reboot is Dracula, in which Karyn Kusama will work with Blumhouse productions on the classic title. It is believed that it will be made with a similarly low to moderate budget much like it’s successful stablemate, The Invisible Man. In an interesting, twist there will also be a cover of the blood thirsty legend directed by Chloe Zhao which will come under the Universal banner.

It’s a truly exciting time for fans of the genre, The manner in which these classic movies are being reproduced seems to be a true nod to their history and their heritage. Very interesting indeed.

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