The Manchurian Candidate: Free Showing Sat Night in Bryan Park – CANCELLED

Tonight’s screening of the Manchurian Candidate has been cancelled due to extreme sogginess. It will be rescheduled. Stay tuned.

Frank Sinatra, Angela Lansbury, Laurence Harvey and Janet Leigh star in The Manchurian Candidate.

Raymond Shaw (Sinatra) is a war hero and is awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his bravery in Korea. What no one knows, including Shaw, is that he had been captured by the Chinese Communists and brainwashed. He is now an unwitting puppet who will do their bidding. Angela Lansbury gives one of the all-time creepy performances as his ambitious, manipulative mother. Directed by John Frankenheimer. (1962; 2 hrs, 6 min)

File this under Art Imitates Real Life (or maybe it’s the other way around)….FBI Assistant Deputy Director Peter Strzok testified before Congress that investigators came to believe it was “conceivable, if unlikely” that Russia was secretly controlling President Donald Trump after he took office — a full-fledged “Manchurian candidate” installed as America’s commander in chief.

Covid Guidelines:

If you are sick, or have any symptoms of Covid-19, please stay home.
Practice physical distancing by staying at least 6 feet away from others.
Wash your hands thoroughly and often; sneeze and cough into your elbow; avoid touching your face.

Chasing Ghosts: The Life of an American Artist

ou can watch this film right here, right now
This illuminating documentary explores the life of a unique American artist, a man with a remarkable and unlikely biography. Bill Traylor was born into slavery in 1853 on a cotton plantation in rural Alabama. After the Civil War, Traylor continued to farm the land as a sharecropper until the late 1920s. Aging and alone, he moved to Montgomery and worked odd jobs in the thriving segregated black neighborhood. A decade later, in his late 80s, Traylor became homeless and started to draw and paint, both memories from plantation days and scenes of a radically changing urban culture. Having witnessed profound social and political change during a life spanning slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, and the Great Migration, Traylor devised his own visual language to translate an oral culture into something original, powerful, and culturally rooted. He made well over a thousand drawings and paintings between 1939-1942. This colorful, strikingly modernist work eventually led him to be recognized as one of America’s greatest self-taught artists and the subject of a Smithsonian retrospective. Using historical and cultural context, Bill Traylor: Chasing Ghosts brings the spirit and mystery of Traylor’s incomparable art to life. Making dramatic and surprising use of tap dance and evocative period music, the film balances archival photographs and footage, insightful perspectives from his descendents, and Traylor’s striking drawings and paintings to reveal one of America’s most prominent artists to a wide audience. CRITIC’S PICK! –The New York Times “An extraordinary artist…Traylor’s pictures stamp themselves on your eye and mind… (nothing) impaired the humor and subtlety of his imagination. Traylor’s art generates a presence at once mighty and fugitive, forever just around the corner of being understood.”  – Peter Schjeldahl, The New Yorker
   

About Endlessness opens this week

No one in the world makes films that look like those of Swedish master absurdist Roy Andersson: intricately designed, photographed, and lit. His dreamlike movies are acclaimed for their deadpan comic timing and the visual inspiration of artists like Otto Dix and Edward Hopper.  Some of you saw his film A PIGEON SAT ON A BRANCH REFLECTING ON EXISTENCE when we showed it in 2015, but just in case you missed it, we are showing it again, along with his new film, ABOUT ENDLESSNESS.

ABOUT ENDLESSNESS (Best Director prize-winner at the Venice Film Festival), opens with a breathtaking shot, inspired by Marc Chagall, of two lovers hovering in the clouds. What follows is pure Andersson, a succession of precisely realized, blackly comic vignettes on the complexities of human nature: a priest loses his faith after recurring nightmares detailing his own crucifixion; a father stops to tie his daughter’s shoelaces in the rain; a man obsesses over a brush-off from an old classmate (“I can’t believe Svenker Olsson got a PhD. It’s really quite annoying”); a couple contentedly sips champagne to the sounds of Billie Holiday; a dentist walks out on a wailing patient and into a bar, downing a drink as snow majestically falls outside; and that couple floats over a war-ravaged Cologne. Addressing the vexing qualities of existence, Andersson mixes the challenges of everyday life with the flashes of beauty and grace we take for granted.

SWEDEN / GERMANY / NORWAY       76 MIN       IN SWEDISH WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES

Another masterpiece of the human condition, ranging from the evils of war to the redemptive power of love…WHAT AN AMAZING EXPERIENCE THIS FILM IS. Andersson’s films are endlessly rewatchable. To view them is to abolish gravity. – Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

We hope to resume weekly, in-person film screenings in August when campus re-opens (assuming there are no surprises). Let’s all cross our fingers and keep them crossed.

In the meantime, please keep the Film Series and The Ryder magazine going and consider making a donation

Are You a Dog Lover? “Stray” Might be the Film For You

You can watch Stray in our virtual theater right here, right now

Woof Woof! Stray explores what it means to live as a being without status or security, following three stray dogs, residents of Istanbul, as they embark on inconspicuous journeys through Turkish society. Zeytin, fiercely independent, embarks on adventures through the city at night; Nazar, nurturing and protective, easily befriends the humans around her; while Kartal, a shy puppy living on the outskirts of a construction site, finds companions in the security guards who care for her. The strays’ disparate lives intersect when they each form intimate bonds with a group of young Syrians with whom they share the streets. (72 mn) An interview with filmmaker Elizabeth Lo will follow the film.

CRITIC’S PICK! Stray builds a subtle, cross-species commentary that’s more than a little melancholy. While never directly political, Lo’s camera is there when the animals encounter a women’s march for equality and, later, when the refugees connect with boatmen who share their own migrant past. The filmmaker’s eyes may rarely leave the dogs, but what she’s really looking at is us. -The New York Times

We hope to resume weekly, in-person film screenings in August when campus re-opens (assuming there are no surprises). Let’s all cross our fingers and keep them crossed.

In the meantime, please keep the Film Series and The Ryder magazine going and consider making a donation

Give the Oscar shorts to a friend

The Academy Awards are Sunday night. If you haven’t watched the Oscar Shorts yet this might be a good time. Here’s the link. And if you have already watched them, you might consider gifting the Shorts to your favorite cinephile. Simply click on the Watch Now button. You’ll find a “Give as a Gift” option just below the Unlock button. The Oscar Shorts are a gift that will be fondly remembered for a long time, or at least until Sunday night.


The new issue of The Ryder magazine is on the virtual newsstands. What’s inside? See for yourself: here’s your personal copy. And here is a snapshot of what you’ll find…

  • Rudy Pozzatti (1925-2021): Rudy Pozzatti embodied the ideal of the artist-teacher. During his lengthy tenure as a distinguished professor at Indiana University, he helped to build the printmaking department into one the best in the country. By Nanette Esseck Brewer
  • Middle Way House Turns 50: “Living in a shelter is tough,” Executive Director Debra Morrow explains. “It’s not your home. The longer people sit in shelter, the harder it is for them to reclaim their lives. “ By Robert F. Arnove
  • The Lilly Library from A to Z: From James Bond’s cigars to locks of Edgar Allen Poe’s hair, the Lilly Library boasts an amazing collection of curiosities.  And they are all in Darlene J. Sadlier’s book, The Lilly Library from A to Z.  By Noah Sandweiss
  • What We Talk About When We Talk About Appalachia: Three films–Hillbilly, Nomadland and Hillbilly Elegy–take on working class white identity in Appalachia.
  • Die Pest: In pandemic times, we search out pandemic tales. Otto Rippert’s silent 1919 film, Die Pest in Florenz (The Plague in Florenz) is a plague film for a plague year.
  • This Old House: Jawshing Arthur Liou’s multichannel video work at the Eskenazai Museum of Art, House of the Singing Winds, embraces high resolution video. But art is directly tied to economics and politics. Money and influence have a particularly unique relationship with the film/video artforms due to high equipment costs, studios, “the industry” and many other components. “IU has many T.C. Steele paintings in its collection,” Liou says. “I’m bringing the whole house.” By Ian Carstens

This issue of The Ryder is funded in part by a Recover Forward grant from the Bloomington Urban Enterprise Association. The grant covers some of our expenses, but not all.
As you flip through this issue of the magazine (85 pages this month!), if you should see a story that you like, or if you would just want to support local, independent journalism, please consider making a donation.


Also in our Virtual Theater: BILL TRAYLOR CHASING GHOSTS

Bill Traylor was born into slavery in 1853 on a cotton plantation in rural Alabama. After the Civil War, Traylor continued to farm the land as a sharecropper until the late 1920s. Aging and alone, he moved to Montgomery and worked odd jobs in the thriving segregated black neighborhood. A decade later, in his late 80s, Traylor became homeless and started to draw and paint, visualizing memories from plantation days and scenes of a radically changing urban culture. Having witnessed profound social and political change during a life spanning slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, and the Great Migration, Traylor devised his own visual language to translate an oral culture into something original, powerful, and culturally rooted. He made well over a thousand drawings and paintings between 1939-1942. This colorful, strikingly modernist work eventually led him to be recognized as one of America’s greatest self-taught artists and the subject of a Smithsonian retrospective. Using historical and cultural context, Bill Traylor: Chasing Ghosts brings the spirit and mystery of Traylor’s incomparable art to life. Making dramatic and surprising use of tap dance and evocative period music, the film balances archival photographs and footage, insightful perspectives from his descendants, and Traylor’s striking drawings and paintings to reveal one of America’s most prominent artists to a wide audience.

New Issue of the Ryder is on the virtual newstands

What’s inside the new issue of The Ryder magazine? See for yourself: here’s your personal copy. And here is a snapshot of what you’ll find…

  • Rudy Pozzatti (1925-2021): Rudy Pozzatti embodied the ideal of the artist-teacher. During his lengthy tenure as a distinguished professor at Indiana University, he helped to build the printmaking department into one the best in the country.
  • Middle Way House Turns 50: “Living in a shelter is tough,” Executive Director Debra Morrow explains. “It’s not your home. The longer people sit in shelter, the harder it is for them to reclaim their lives. “
  • The Lilly Library from A to Z: From James Bond’s cigars to locks of Edgar Allen Poe’s hair, the Lilly Library boasts an amazing collection of curiosities.  And they are all in Darlene J. Sadlier’s book, The Lilly Library from A to Z. 
  • What We Talk About When We Talk About Appalachia: Three films–Hillbilly, Nomadland and Hillbilly Elegy–take on working class white identity in Appalachia.
  • Die Pest: In pandemic times, we search out pandemic tales. Otto Rippert’s silent 1919 film, Die Pest in Florenz (The Plague in Florenz) is a plague film for a plague year.
  • This Old House: Jawshing Arthur Liou’s multichannel video work at the Eskenazai Museum of Art, House of the Singing Winds, embraces high resolution video. But art is directly tied to economics and politics. Money and influence have a particularly unique relationship with the film/video artforms due to high equipment costs, studios, “the industry” and many other components. “IU has many T.C. Steele paintings in its collection,” Liou says. “I’m bringing the whole house.”

This issue of The Ryder is funded in part by a Recover Forward grant from the Bloomington Urban Enterprise Association. The grant covers some of our expenses, but not all.
As you flip through this issue of the magazine (85 pages this month!), if you should see a story that you like, or if you would just want to support local, independent journalism, please consider making a donation.


The Oscar Shorts

The Academy Awards are Sunday night. If you haven’t watched the Oscar Shorts yet this might be a good time. Here’s the link. And if you have already watched them, you might consider gifting the Shorts to your favorite cinephile. The Oscar Shorts are a gift that will be fondly remembered for a long time, or at least until Sunday night.


Also in our Virtual Theater: BILL TRAYLOR CHASING GHOSTS

Bill Traylor was born into slavery in 1853 on a cotton plantation in rural Alabama. After the Civil War, Traylor continued to farm the land as a sharecropper until the late 1920s. Aging and alone, he moved to Montgomery and worked odd jobs in the thriving segregated black neighborhood. A decade later, in his late 80s, Traylor became homeless and started to draw and paint, visualizing memories from plantation days and scenes of a radically changing urban culture. Having witnessed profound social and political change during a life spanning slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, and the Great Migration, Traylor devised his own visual language to translate an oral culture into something original, powerful, and culturally rooted. He made well over a thousand drawings and paintings between 1939-1942. This colorful, strikingly modernist work eventually led him to be recognized as one of America’s greatest self-taught artists and the subject of a Smithsonian retrospective. Using historical and cultural context, Bill Traylor: Chasing Ghosts brings the spirit and mystery of Traylor’s incomparable art to life. Making dramatic and surprising use of tap dance and evocative period music, the film balances archival photographs and footage, insightful perspectives from his descendants, and Traylor’s striking drawings and paintings to reveal one of America’s most prominent artists to a wide audience.

The Oscar Shorts Festival

You can watch The Oscar Shorts right here, right now!

The Oscar Shorts offer a vision of what the Academy Awards should and could be but very rarely are: eclectic, cosmopolitan, scrappy and surprising.
-A.O. Scott, The New York Times

One of the most entertaining categories at the Academy Awards — and one of the least heralded — is for the Best Short Subject. We are featuring the nominees for Best Short Animated, Live-Action and Documentary Film. Below are brief descriptions of each nominee.

The Oscar Shorts open on Friday, April 2nd and will stay on our calendar through April 30th. This is your chance to see all 15 nominated films before the awards ceremony on April 25th.

Tickets: Each program is $12. You can bundle all three into one package for $30. As with all of the films we have been screening for the past year in our virtual theater, 50% of the proceeds will eventually make their way back to us and help keep us going during the pandemic.

All films are unrated; the ratings included here are, basically, our best guess for what they would be rated. You know your kids better than we do. That said, parents should feel free to email us (editor@theryder.com) with questions about the appropriateness of films for younger viewers and children should feel free to email us if they feel their parents have become hopelessly out of touch with the contemporary world.

You will find a link right here on April 2nd to begin watching the Oscar Shorts.

ANIMATED SHORT FILMS, approximately 92 minutesNinety-six films qualified for Best Animated Short. This category includes the five nominees along with three bonus films that were shortlisted for a nomination, but came up short. (Rated PG-13)

BURROW, Madeline Sharafian and Michael Capbarat, USA, 6 minutes.
A young rabbit tries to build the burrow of her dreams, becoming embarrassed each time she accidentally digs into a neighbor’s home.

GENIUS LOCI, Adrien Merigeau and Amaury Ovise, France, 16 minutes.
One night, Reine, a young loner, sees among the urban chaos a moving oneness that seems alive, like some sort of guide. (This film features adult language.)

IF ANYTHING HAPPENS I LOVE YOU, Will McCormack and Michael Govier, USA, 12 minutes.
Grieving parents struggle with the loss of their daughter after a school shooting. An elegy on grief. (Might not be suitable for children 12 and under)

OPERA, Erick Oh, South Korea/USA, 9 minutes.A stunning, multi-layered pyramidal tour portrait of the cycles, foibles, and wonder of humanity, filled with beauty and absurdity.

YES-PEOPLE, Gisli Darri Halldorsson and Arnar Gunnarson, Iceland, 8 minutes.
One morning an eclectic mix of people face the everyday battle, such as work, school and dish-washing. As the day progresses, their relationships are tested and ultimately their capacity to cope.

Bonus Films:

THE SNAIL AND THE WHALE, Max Lang and Daniel Snaddon UK/Germany, 26 minutes.
The heartwarming story of a snail who lives on a rock and wants to see the world so gets a lift from a huge humpback whale. Based on the picture book written by the creators of the lovable Gruffalo, Julia Donaldson and illustrator Axel Scheffler. Character voices are lovingly provided by stars Diana Riggs, Sally Hawkins, David Cumming and Rob Brydon.

KAPAEMAHU, Dean Hamer and Joe Wilson, USA, 7 minutes.
Long ago, four extraordinary individuals of dual male and female spirit brought the healing arts from Tahiti to Hawaii. Beloved by the people for their gentle ways and miraculous cures, they imbued four giant boulders with their powers. The stones still stand on what is now Waikiki Beach, but the true story behind them has been hidden – until now. Narrated in an ancient Hawaiian dialect, Kapaemahu brings this powerful legend back to life in vivid animation, seen through the eyes of a curious child.

TO: GERARD, Taylor Meacham, USA, 8 minutes.
A sprightly elderly man, through a little magic, gives a child the ability to dream of possibilities. First shown at the Annecy International Animated Film Festival in France, the retro feel of this story is perfectly set by the French influenced, European styles of animation.

LIVE ACTION SHORT FILMS, approximately 124 minutes
One hundred seventy-four films qualified in the category, these are the nominees. (Rated R, Adult Themes and Language)

FEELING THROUGH, Dough Roland and Susan Ruzenski, 19 minutes.
A late-night encounter on a New York City street leads to a profound connection between a teen in need and a man who is DeafBlind.

THE LETTER ROOM, Elvira Lind and Sofia Sondervan, 30 minutes.
When a corrections officer is transferred to the letter room, he soon finds himself enmeshed in a prisoner’s deeply private life.

THE PRESENT, Farah Nabulsi, 25 minutes.
On his wedding anniversary, Yusef and his young daughter set out in the West Bank to buy his wife a gift. Between soldiers, segregated roads and checkpoints, how easy would it be to go shopping?

TWO DISTANT STRANGERS,  Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe, 29 minutes.
Cartoonist Carter James’ repeated attempts to get home to his dog are thwarted by a recurring deadly encounter that forces him to relive the same awful day over.

WHITE EYE, Tomer Shushan and Shira Hohcman, 21 minutes.
A man finds his stolen bicycle, which now belongs to a stranger. While attempting to retrieve it, he struggles to remain human.

DOCUMENTARY SHORT FILMS, approximately 135 minutesOne hundred fourteen films qualified in the category, these are the nominees. (Rated R

A CONCERTO IS A CONVERSATION, Ben Proudfoot and Kris Bowers, 13 minutes.
A virtuoso jazz pianist and film composer tracks his family’s lineage through his 91-year-old grandfather from Jim Crow Florida to the Walt Disney Concert Hall.

A LOVE SONG FOR LATASHA, Sophia Nahli Allison and Janice Duncan, 19 minutes.
An evocative exploreation of 15-year-old Latasha Harlin’s life and dreams. subsequent to her death in 1992.

COLETTE, Anthony Giacchino and Alice Doyard, 25 minutes.
Former French Resistance member Colette Marin-Catherine refused to step foot in Germany for 74 years. This changes when a young history student named Lucie enters her life and convinces her to visit the concentration camp where the Nazis killed her brother.

DO NOT SPLIT, Anders Hammer and Charlotte Cook, 35 minutes.
In 2019 a proposed bill allowing the Chinese government to extradite criminal suspects to mainland China escalated protests throughout Hong Kong. DO NOT SPLIT captures the determination and sacrifices of the protesters, the government’s backlash, and the passage of the new Beijing-backed national security law.

HUNGER WARD, Skye Fitzgerald and Michael Scheuerman, 40 minutes.
Filmed from inside two of the most active therapeutic feeding centers in Yemen, HUNGER WARD documents two female health care workers fighting to thwart the spread of starvation against the backdrop of a forgotten war. The film provides an unflinching portrait of Dr. Aida Alsadeeq and Nurse Mekkia Mahdi as they try to save the lives of hunger-stricken children within a population on the brink of famine.

WOMEN COMPOSERS

Women Composers opens this week in our virtual theater. Y

You can watch Women Composers right here, right now

When Leipzig pianist Kyra Steckeweh realized that her repertoire almost exclusively consisted of music composed by men, she began searching for pieces written by female composers. Her research in archives, libraries, and publishing houses quickly brought to light a variety of remarkable piano pieces that have been buried in history and rarely performed. Steckeweh sees a lot of catching up to do, which is why the focus of her piano recitals and recordings has since shifted to the music of women composers, particularly Mel Bonis, Lili Boulanger and Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel.

With these releases she has brought to our attention and delight three very different composers, all of whom left a diverse body of work. In addition to the in-depth examination of the music, Steckeweh, as a pianist and historian, seeks to look “behind the notes”: How did these women live? What barriers did they have to overcome and how did they manage to cope with the obstacles of their time? “Women Composers” highlights the historical and personal circumstances under which these three remarkable women created their works in the 19th and early 20th centuries.


Jane Fonda & Donald Sutherland in FTA

In 1971, at the height of the Vietnam War, Jane Fonda and Donald Sutherland toured an anti-war comedy show across Southeast Asia. It was directly engaged with and inspired by veterans against the war and, naturally, it upset U.S. military higher-ups. The F.T.A. tour was highly controversial and was a huge success among stationed soldiers. In spite of enthusiastic reviews and box office buzz, the film version was quickly taken out of circulation due to political pressures and has been difficult to see for decades. (Officially, “FTA” stood for “Free the Army.” Unofficially . . . well, we think you can figure out what it stood for unofficially.

A present-day interview with Jane Fonda precedes the film.

“A genuine, powerful and even stirring expression of the antipathy engendered by war…and scarred the psyches of those who lived through it.” – J. Hoberman, The New York Times

“F.T.A. has enormous contemporary resonance.” – AV Club

“Sounding out a once-elusive call of defiance for all to hear…[Fonda] and her comrades loved the country that they devoted their energies and risked their reputations to better it, their criticisms the ultimate act of patriotism.” – Charles Bramesco, The Guardian

“Holds up as a terrifically funny movie. Nixon might be long dead, but if you want to sock it to him regardless, be sure to check this out.” – Dan Schindel, Hyperallergic


MARCH/APRIL ISSUE OF THE RYDER

The March / April issue of The Ryder magazine is on the virtual newsstands–here is your personal copy.

There’s a new Bob Ross museum in Muncie. Mason Cassady writes about the iconic painter and television star in Bob Ross: Person, Painter and Perm.

Legendary arthouse filmmaker Werner Herzog visited IU in 2012 and Dennis J. Reardon, Head of the Playwriting Program at IU, unashamedly glommed on to him. It would be a stretch to say that they were inseparable, but they spent a lot of time together. Dennis J. Reardon looks back at a defining week in his life in Stalking Werner.

Many people have time on their hands during the pandemic. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. Sally Harvey has put her time to productive use by breaking into the homes of her neighbors and she writes about it in My Preferred Pandemic Life.

Ether Game turns 50 (!) and more in this month’s issue

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